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7B – Carpe Jugulum - Part 2

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Our long-awaited second episode on Carpe Jugulum, covering the literary development of the vampire from the early-nineteenth century through to the publication of Carpe Jugulum almost two hundred years later in 1998 and beyond! We discuss Lord Byron (a lot) and his influence on the early vampire characterisation and his influence on other nineteenth-century vampire texts, including the unjustly overlooked Varney the Vampire as well as the more influential Carmilla and Dracula. (After moving house and catching COVID,) we then turn to the twentieth-century, discussing early cinematic iterations on Dracula and the shift toward sympathetic and overly Byronic representations via TV series like Dark Shadows and books like Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles, ending up in the 1990s and the wild experimentation that was going on around Pratchett when he wrote his final Witches book.

What's do as world? Let's do as world podcast analysis. Yeah, so I'm Josh and I'm Alice and we are the unseen academicals. We're back from break. Still can't see yes, still can't see us. Oh, yes, we're still unseen and while I'm looking at you right now, no one else is allowed special thing we have. Okay, it's been a while. Else it's been like two months since we're recorded one of these. Yeah, so we're back to we haven't even read a book for our Pratchett Book, since we're still talking about our carpet Jugula, and we're going to be for a while, because I've read. I haven't read any Pratchett, but I've read all the vampire books, even more than I'd read last time, and watched nearly nearly a hundred vampire movies. All Shit, Josh. Now, because Maddie and I, yes, we originally. So this is a bit of bonus onseen academicals content here. Yes, originally we were going to do Vamptober, which is like October when people watch like dirty horror movies during October and the lead up to Halloween. We're going to Vamptober and we got a very carefully curated list of thirty one vampire movies and yeah, we we while we watch them. We got up to like twenty five or twenty six or something, and that's when the power went out, I remember, which is when we recorded the first part, the last episode, but because the powdering come back on for like two or three days, we missed a whole bunch of days. So we ended up missing a week right at the end, and then we're like, well, we've gone over, there's a couple others were interested in, so why don't we just like watch a few more during November and then we'll record at the end of November and then we're like, oh, this is this is going our ou there's still some more we want to watch. So where we do? For December, we watched like a movie, or a vampire movie are too, pretty much every day for October, Noveb December, Holy Shit. And then at the start of general or our was the end of the Sember, we've actually recorded the first half of a podcast, being like because we're breaking into two parts, and be like is the forty worst vampire movies and the forty best vampire movies there abouts, because we had about eighty and we recorded the first half where we talked about like to forty or whatever it is, and then we were like there's a couple more, though. Really haven't round talk about some of the singles, so we've decided to go for a hundred. Ok, we're currently, I think, about ninety nine, one, ninety two. So we're going to finish those out and the hopefully record that and drop it by the end of the Bove because that was a special bonus content. Yeah, but I don't know if we'll use that the original recording, but we had we had fun doing that and got some good conversation about so that's coming. Today. We're here to talk about all the vampires. Ever. Yeah, this is this is going to be one of those ones like the Alf one that we did for Lords and ladies, where we're not really talking at about Pratchett but we are using couple juggling, more specifically one throwaway scene in carpig drugging them as a framework to talk about the literary histories and things of vampire stuff. This is going to be I've been pitching the stats as a spinoff podcast. This is the crossover between I'm seen academicals and of the Devil's Party. This is talking about Byron with Josh and Ellis, because Manfred came out and canes about to come out and then we're going to go to the monkeys, so join us. Oh No, I think this is still good stuff, though, because I think it brings people into Patrick Pratchett. Like I've been talking to people or at work about this, like octoually, this's my podcast. Be Like Vampires, because we're going to talk about all of them, ever, and they're like all of them are like yeah, this guy jobs, like he's been in a band and he's been watching these things with his girlfriend and the whole thing, and they're like Oh, and they kind of get that afraid look in their eye. Okay, so, you know, I think I think we might get some more people through this, which is cool. Well, because of the afraid look, the premise. Honest, we go from all I'm really into vampires and then I turn around and say, Oh, we're doing a podcast with all with this guy who's like being in a van, and then they're like, Whoa, this conversation explained bad. I've gone postal. I'm driving postpres very head listen to vampire audio books. Yeah, that's it just sounds like it's like my coffin. I'll go there's van and I come out during the day, all the during the night or what? I came up at six in the morning. These do that's find. Some of them joy born as a vampire. All right, what we're going to do is there's a scene in carpet jack of them, I don't know if you remember. We're flat, walks down the whole points to all the portraits on the wall and says that's my great uncle, great arm there are. They're all the different vampires. Yep, essentially, I think the vampires there. He's sticking to other the film vampires. I think it's not for Otu Comilla and the Hammer Dracula are the ones on the wall. I'm using that as an excuse to talk about the development of the appliers throughout our mostly literary history in this case, but films as well, since recorded things were recorded. Yeah, so we're going to start with, we're going to be sticking skipping over folklore pretty much because there's just too much of it. I don't care. Yes, and then we're going to talk about the monstrous vampires of the nineteen century, which circulates a right on board bier, which is why I'm glad els is here, and then Dracula is the big one. Then the early two films of the early twenty century and some of the developments of the vampire archetype there, and then the sympathization of the vampire in the...

...later half of the twenty century, bringing us up to when Pratchett is writing Copper Jack of them in the s to sort of talk about how the vampire tradition has changed. And Yeah, where it's that when Pratchett steps in and we might might took a little bit about what comes after, just as I throw away thing. But obviously it's not relevant to the book. But it is interesting where the vampire goes and I might talk about that a bit more on the future episodes, because Elsa is right, this is going to be a three part of plus, like I'm billion bonus episodes. Does that sound good to you? Elis, the MOLLUSK is pleased. So I live in a van and Alice is a mollusk. That's what you need to know. All right, kick us off. All right. So, yeah, I don't really want to talk much about the folklore, but just to give it a bit of lip service, Lisa the doser in her book that I didn't write. There think it's called how to kill a vampire, and this is this is sort of like one of those are pop academic academy ones that we were like an off before, but it's very good. If you want us like a primer on the like vampire tropes throughout history, this book's very good. So that is a Lisa with two eyes, led USA, I think it's is, and it's called how to kill a vampire. Brought out of that. Will talk more about this in part three, which is when I want to go through and talk about like the actual tropes, like the garlic and the crosses and things, the actual how to kill a vampire part of it. But in that book she points out, to sort of link this into Pratchett in the witcher series, that the list of people targeted for Vampiresm in folklore tradicially includes alcoholics, robbers, godless folk prostitutes, murder victims, assenes supposed which is webels, and dreadful and treacherous barmaids as opposed to a regular barmy. Yes, to see ful Treasureus Barmaids, which is say that, just like which hunting in folklore, vampire hunting was a way to solve mysterious bad luck by skpegoating the most unpopular folks in town. So, just like we've been talking about the old women in the cottage being, you know, the scapegoat, to say Oh, she's a witch burner, vampires in pre nineteen century literary history folklore was sort of like a way to do that with with the town drunk. So yes, similarly, project and Simpson's back this up in the folklore of discworld, saying that early European Vampires were not aristocrats but village folk that did not look like noble gentleman in black cloaks or luscious women in low cut ball gowns. They look like what they were, corpses. Nice. So the the actual origins and all the myths of Vampires are. There's too much of them, as also like it's too scattered to go into write. The idea of what a vampire is really gets courtified through the literary tradition, through Byron in the nineteen century and Polydorian and especially stoker. Is Dracula right, because before that vampires are just the undead. They're not. They're not even bloodsuckers, right. We talked about in the last episode how vampires were sort of soul sucking incubis ghosts, but also vampire was used interchangeably with zombies and werewelves. It was just the UNDEAD, right. I think the progression is when someone dies, that become as Zombie and then they become a werewolf and then when the whalelfs killed, it becomes a vampire and then there's ghosts. Okay, so like an abstract dead entity thing. Yeah, it's just the the UNDEAD, right. I mean that's what Dracula translates NOS FARATU in not dreys. STOKER TRANSLATES MOSS FARATO AS IN DRACULA. It's just the undead. And there the original title of DRACUTIL WAS MEANT TO BE DRACULA OF THE ARM dead. Yes, as as I mentioned, the introduction the evolution of the Leary vampire, or the the pop culture vampire, is shown in carbage over them by the magpire family portraits. As project explains, what Agnes is shown is the evolution of Vampires from Harpy to Harry Monster to Legocie Lee the spell ago, seeing christophile in the universal and Harrahma horror films and ultimately a Byronic Bastard. There we go. We have Pratchett using the word by Ronic, although he's got it backwards, because Byron comes before all of all of these, as we'll get to. And he says, and what better way to demonstrate this than a succession of family portraits? What better way to structure a podcast? So let's get into it then, with the the literary evolution there. So the first picture, Agnes, is shown, it says, and here, well, some distant ancestor. That's all I know. This picture was mostly dark, varnished. There was a suggestion of a beak on a hunched figure. So I think it's Pretchett explaining this, that this is a depiction of the stricks, which is a character from rouman mythology that stabbed and drank blood through its beak. In Romanian it was referred to as a Strogoi or STRAGOYCA and it was a type of shapeshifting blood sucking, which interesting that it's gendered female. Right. This is Lilith, essentially. Yeah, she's the Shriek owl or whatever. And and Lilith has shows up as a vampire and in a bunch of things. You're so the term like this figure of the vampire doesn't really exist past stoker Environ, but you do get the words Trogoy, especially more recent vampire fiction, carries on. So it is referred to in Dracula, where that's what the Romanian village people refer to vampires as, or out there the NUS Farti, there the strogoy. But now this is commonly used in twenty one century vampire fiction as...

...a label for, like, quote en quote, bad or evil vampires. In Vampire Academy there's the Good Vampires, who are the Maroy, and the bad vampires who are the strogoy. This happens in some other ones that I can't think of off the top of my head, but this is a term that sort of like. Yes, the more monstrous evil vampires are called Stragoi and designated as tragoing. A lot of one vampire fiction will get to this eventually. But now that the vampires become sort of a heroic, civilized figure by playing it off a against this monstrous outside was, that's sort of Repeating Dracula. Now the vampires have become the civilized culture that are threatened by this monstrous outsider. That's interesting. You also have the in carpet juggule and you have a lady Strag oil whose daughter has taken to calling yourself Wendy. So yes, that's that's referring to sort of the traditional folklore version of the vampire. Then there is the portrait of the old count to Magpire, the father of the present one and remembered by some in carpet juggul them as old red eyes, which is dracut. Dracula has red eyes, but I think this is more referring to Christophee and the ham a horror films like closeups of his red eyes. And then Sarka, he's old red eyes, which is also obviously a reference to our Frank Sinatra, big Ol Blue Eyes. That's the jerk there. But he has, rather than resembling what we think of as Dracula, which is Christoph Lee in the s Hammond movies. There old counter magpie has a bold head, dark rim staring eyes to teeth like needles, two ears like Bat Wings and fingernails that hadn't been trimmed for eat four years. So this is count all lock from Nos FERATU. It's okay, yeah, that's WHO's here, which also they in the film version of Salem's like the the vampire and that which normally this is what the strogoy you look like now, right, monstrous. They got the long cause they got the primitive teeth. So yeah, here we're talking about can't count all lock in Oserati. Will come back to him when we get to Noserato in the timeline, which isn't for another hundred years. But now I want to go into the beginning of the literary vampire tradition, which the earliest example that I can find evidence of is twenty I've Sanskrit fables starring it. Of alternately ultimately read it as victrum the vampire or King Vicarim and the vampire. So I don't think vicrum is actually the vampire, but a lot of copies of the book we called Vicrm the Vampire, I think. But yes, this is a a sands collection of sanscript fables dating back to seven hundred and thirty a d so quite old and I'm like, obviously there's folklore before that, but this is the first sort of written version. I do have a copy of this. I have not read it well. modernly, you have the gem poem der Vampire by Heinrich August awsome felt from one thousand seven, hundred and forty eight, which is perhaps the first modern vampire poem. Right. This is an immortal blood drinking creature we're talking about here. And then you also have get your hand Wolfgang Lot and the Geta his one seventeen ninety seven poem, the bride of Corinth, which is about an Athenian man who is visited by the ghost of a young girl to whom he was betrothed, but then her family converts to Christianity, dooming her to a life of chastity, so she dies of grief. This relatable? Not at all. Do you have anything to to say about girder? Listen to the man for an episode of of the Devil's party, because we have about twenty minutes on Gerda. Just that he was a huge influence on Byron. I think that this is the place and time, all the time and place rather, to say it like it. was a very proud man and he's very frustrated with Byron's work because he kind of felt that Byron didn't give him enough credit, because Byron didn't give him enough credit. So you know, if it was here, Byron read it like he read the bride of Corinth. No, I'm glad you said that, because that actually does give us a link to what happens, rather me just listing things because, yeah, I'm like other sort of proto vampire stories, like Christa Belle Coleridge is Christa Bell, which is sort of like a ghost sucky this lady I sort of thing, if you ask Patrick. Or what's the other one you mentioned? I know this comes later. There's a Keatswan for the nights dying. Let's go, like a weird French name or so sure, I'm so sick. That's the one. Yeah, would you mentioned in one of the previous episodes, but I don't know what the context was. Yeah, a lot of these early poems are about, like, yeah, ghostly figures who come and normally sleep with the person. So they like ghostly ink of this. The reason why I go to his version is significant is because it's explicitly about blood sucking, which I think is what we now associate like that's sort of what I know. There's energy vampires and things, but what we think of as vampires that seems to be the definitive characteristic. Well, we're here. It's interesting that we're like again, there's still kind of women, some of them, and that idea which were talked about, which with witchcraft or whatever, is that this fear that meant women would come and suck the man hold out and then you'd lose your virility in your life. And now vampires blood sucking, like it's a kind of a similar vibe as the key side, energy transference. Yeah, talking about but the Trinity, except YEA, here it's women blood, which is like that's the whole little thing, right, is that? According to the Jewish legend, thing is that her sin or her whatever was bad about her was that she wanted to be on top Lilis. Guess I just hadn't heard of power bottoming back then. Yeah, Greek, Greek records actually hang on. Yes, you're right, body a thing. That's what profit was. We absolutely UH.

But yeah, the earliest instance of the World Vampire in English literature comes in Robert Southeast Poem, the fellow of the destroyer, from one thousand eight hundred one. We're in a group of sorcerers from Dom Daniel, which we talk about in our game and episode. So you can go and listen to that if you want to hear about what DM Daniel is. So, yes, a group of sorcerers from Dom Daniel Attempt to avert the prophecy of a Muslim warthell. A bark was faded to destroy all sorcerers. Do you know this one? Else said he's one of your guys. I read it the very start of my ph it wasn't important and I never went back to it. It's very long. Yeah, I only read the start of book eight, which is the relevant section, which describes an encounter with a demon who has possessed the dead body of fellow his wife, Onezia, who feliber propertly dispels by thrusting his lance through the Vampire Corps, which, you know, you can read whatever fell like imagery into that you want. I will, but yeah, this is where we get the word vampire from, although yet it's again, this is the ghostly apparition of the dead wife come to suck his soul rather than a blood side of this is more like the dead eye. Said Zombie Demons, you get like evil dead or something like that. We also we never get lances again, as a specific method of disposing vampires. There, of course, like you know, you get impalement and and all sorts of steaking and all that be. Don't get a specific like he has the magical lance. Yet magical swords and things. Lance never comes up. So the initial original vampire killing till was not a long lived one. Yeah, this point vampires are still undead zombies wherewolves goes. The modern conception of a vampire, along with the beginning of the English vampire literary tradition, of course, begins about twenty years later with your boy Lord Borrowing. Sir. Yes, mentioned Lord Barron a few times. Go listen to Alice a man for the episode which fucking our was. Guys, it is in the it is in the unseen academicals feed, so they probably listen't to it. For people who didn't listen to a man for an episode, do you want to give us like the five cented summary of WHO Lord Byron is? All right, so he's a second generation romantic poet, yes, from the early nineteen century. He is one of, probably the second author writer to Actually Make Bank out of writing and was incredibly popular for his narrative style poetry, which use existing archetypes and drew them together to characterize a very specific character type, which is this kind of Broody, sympathetic, dark, evil, past gloomy character that we all know and love, called the Byronic Heuro which Alice is writing their thesis about. Yeah, Sir Barron was exposed to vampire folk law during his grand tour of Europe the start of the nineteen century and started embedding these ideas into his poetry with his one thousand eight hundred and thirteen Orientalis poem, the g hour, which is about a Turkish heretic who kills the man who drowned his lover, with the narrator predicting that as punishment. Do you want to read this one else? First, on Earth, as vampire, sent like corpse shell from its tomb, be rent than ghastly haunt by native place and suck the blood of all thy race there, from their daughter, sister, a wife, at midnight, drain the stream of life, yet loath the banquet which perforce must feed thy Livid, living corpse. They victims ere, they yet expire, shall know the demon for their sire right. So this is what the the Gr the go he doesn't have a name. That's just who he is. Is Saying, Oh, I've seenned by committing this murder, so my punishment is I'm going to come back as an undeadened. First at the blood. So we don't have an actual vampire in this poem, just the idea. But this is a concert uh Huh. It's also sort of this wandering Jew figure, right, like Kine, who again go lis analysis podcast to hear more about but yeah, so he's a wondering Jew figure is condemned to kill his own family by sucking their blood. But I thought interesting for your purposes. He goes to the monastery to repent, which was something you brought up as this like characteristic thing of the byronic hero. This repentance is really the thing Byron brings to it. But yeah, so here we have demon wherever. Demonic origin is still hanging over that something that disappears. Later on. We got blood sucking, but yeah, no actual vampire appearance. The first actual appearance of a vampire comes as a result of the famous Genevan ghost story night that also gave us Frankenstein. And else is doing their way. They inflatable man arms. Yeah, sorry for people who aren't aware, the shelley's and Byron. so that's Percy Shelley and Mary Shelley who wrote Frankenstein, and Percy Shelley who wrote poetry, and by and Shelly, Mary Shelley's lesser known husband. Yeah, then, much more famous but has not really stood. The artist of Talenge, intimate children, and Claire Claremont and we're probably Dory, probably some other people. But yeah, they the bar and Chelly Circle. They went hung out in this mansion in Geneva. That else has been into this one. Yeah, out then. You knew that. And they read a collection of I think it's French. I thought it was German. Phantasmagory as German. Yeah, sorry, German ghost stories called Phantasmagoriana in Nice. I'm have you read any of these? I downloaded it at one point, but not. There's two sort of empire stories in there. There's the ghost bride, which is sort of a Camilla story. It actually has a character called Camilla, so I'm sure that was not some kind of influence. But also, significantly, the character of...

...that story that tell of her being a vampire is she has the mark of a small strawberry on her neck. If you cast your mind back to I think like episode three of Unseen Academicals, when we were talking about Macbeth and weird sisters. There was the whole thing about the strawberry birthmark being the mark of the king. Look out what it was. Now this is an it, but this is the only time I found a specific reference to a small strawberry birthmark. Okay, so either it's just coincidence or I mean this is mark of a small store, because I was starting to think that strawberry was a color rather than a shape. Right there have a red birthmark rather than a strawberry shaped birthmark maybe, but this is the mark of a small strawberry. So that but that's just weirdly found this this connection there, but I don't know what it means. And Apparently Byron also recited the start of Christo Bell which was then published. So we've got some of the easier, these proto ghost vampire stories being read at night. And then they or they all challenged each other to ry to go story and Mary Shelley wrote frank in Stein, their Barron also started writing a vampire story about a dude named Augusta Starville who is more than usually robust for his age and her, after being apparently modally wounded by bandits, asked the narrator to bury him and throw his Arabic ring into the Bay of Elucius on the ninth day of the months that we don't have any actual vampire activity in this story, although Barron's letters make double's nature clear, that the story was to go on that he would then be resurrected to be a vampire who comes back to haunt the narrator in his town. This story fragment was later published in the magazine MAZEPPA in one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, after Barron abandoned plans to expand it into a nun into a novel. It might have been published alongside MAZEPPA in a magazine. So I might have been in a magazine with MAZEPPA. I was MAZEPPA, not the magazine Byron Palm. HMM. Yeah, while I've misinterpreted that right, I thought MAZEPPA was the name of the magazine. Yeah, Barnes idea for the story was, however, later adapted into the eighteen nineteen short story the vampire that's vampire. Whether why? By Barron's position? John William Pollardori Alis. Do you want to explain the pot plot briefly? Here dude meets Lord Rough and Lord rough friend dies, but then he shows up again and like the Society of the English aristocracy, and there's dudes like hey, he's trouble and no one listens to him. And then he wants to marry his sister, yeah, the narrator's sister and a sister, and then kills her and it's it really takes the vampire narrative in terms. It into a narrative of about the the soul sucking aristocracy. I mean it's about it's about lots of things, but like we had but before this, vampires are female succupy and then here we have a male succuby, because we have he comes back and he's like picking off all the women of the town one by one. I'm working his way up to the sister who, significantly, is only eighteen and had not yet been presented to the world. So this is the implication of virginity, but also, yeah, that she's about to enter adulthood and be preyed upon. I think there's a few things at play and you've probably it was partly politory, making fun of Byron and the way by iron engages with the world around trust perfect, but drus perfect. Let's go with that. But also the aristocracy more broadly. I was just talking with pet the other day how in the sort of in the eighteen and the nineteen century, we move away from the aristocracy like having a job, like they've got to do things to just be it, being assholes with money who have money and no concept of wealth for how to use it all, what to do with it or really anything, and so they're just ask the whole time machine. Yeah, right there, you like. Yeah, so I think it's criticism of of that in society and that because this guy comes and fashions himself as an English gentleman and then like goes about sucking blood. I think it's part of it and it's like it's like because Lord Byron is a Lord. Right, so that that is tied in with the characterization I fincss and Lord, even though he's depicted as this rebel figure, he is of the upper upper class. Yeah, he had a fucked on the money, and this is where we get the first depiction of the vampires, a seductive romantic figure which I've got this big long paragraph here. Did you want to read this here? Um, the common a dodgers could not influence even the guidance of his eyes. It was not that the sex was indifferent to him, but such, sorry, it was not that the sex was indifferent to him. Think that means it meaning gender. there. So not the woman, where a different side was the option with which he spoke to the virtuous wife and innocent daughter that few knew he ever addressed himself to females. He had, however, the reputation of a winning tongue. Yeah, and whether it was that this even overcame the dread of his singular character, or that they were moved by his apparent hatred advice he was, as often among these females were adorn the sex by their domestic virtues, as among those who sullient by their vices, and that by feeding upon the life of a lovely female to prolong his existence for the ensuing months, his blood would run cold whilst he attempted to laugh her out of such idle and horrible fantasies. So it's like the seductive figure taking the pure virgin and making her away. Would woman. There's something here, like we're talking about. This is like a parody, caricature of Byron. Right, he seducing women with his tongue. Right, it's his poetry. Women Roll letters to Byron being like I feel like I know you,...

...like I love you, like literally felt like they understood him through his poetry, because I can't remember whether he's like particularly attractive, like he sort of described as as, what's the word malnourished? That was kind of in fashion, though, right, but I think it was meant to show his like, while he's his vampireishness, that he is on a malnourished but lacking something lacking, lacking in life. I don't know. So the narrator watches Lord Ruthven, but the very impossibility of forming an idea of the character of a man entirely absorbed in himself, of one who gave few other signs of his observation of external objects than the tasset assent to their existence implied by the avoidance of their contact, at last allowed his imagination to picture something that flattened its propensity to extravagant ideas. He soon formed this person into the hero of a romance and determined to observe the offspring of his fancy rather than the individual before him. So this is the idea of the yeah, the Romanticizing of the monster, which is the Byronic hero, at the sympathizing of the gothic villain is literally written into the foundational step text of Byronic Vampires. Right, YEP, there's a boy. Yeah, but this is a Barron down, this is a polydority. It's interesting that he does it as a criticism of Biron, because not on this podcast, from my podcast, to talk about lady Carol and Lamb, who writes Glenn Avin, which is like this thinly veiled Romanticaliv novel about her relationship with Byron. And like lots of other people were doing this, writing about Byron because he was such a celebrity. And so he's criticizing him. But actually it turns into the greatest flattery ever because he establishes Byron himself as a literary archetype. So I think about this the other day. I'm like maybe this is where it comes from, like not the Byronic hero as an established figure, but like the Byronic hero is just Byron. Yeah, and this is also like what's going on in carpet Jugglin is all the people in the town just think the vampires are really charming, but they can't see the the real thing that's in front of them. So I think that's interesting. There's also the physical law. Since I did such a horrible job of reading that last one, do you want to read this one again? Our so those who felt this sensation of are could not explain whence it arose. So I'm attributed it to the glance of that dead gray eye which, fixing upon the object space, seemed not to penetrate and at one look, to pierce through the inward workings of the heart, but to throw upon the cheek a letten ray that weighed upon the sun. It could not pass. Some, however, thought that it was caused by their fearing the observation of one who, by his colorless cheek, which never gained a warmer tint from the blush of conscious shame or from any powerful emotion, appeared to appeared to be above human feelings and sympathies, the fashionable names for frailties and sins. His peculiarities caused him to be invited to every house. All wish to see him, and those who had been accustomed to violent excitement and now felt the weight of on. We were pleased at having something in their presence capable of engaging their attention. And this is society's response to Byron's fiction. Like that's exactly what's happening. Yeah, this is the like we know we shouldn't like it, but we're fascinated by it. Sort of thing. This is like he's not he has a physical law, but he's not sexy. He's like curious and beamed. The the vampires only like forty pages long or something, but every time I've read it it's just been an absolute slog and I think us trying to read these paragraphs have pointed out why. It's because polydor he's a terrible is a terrible rider. I'm so glad I was saving that. Yeah, there, he's awful. It was such a Dickhead as well. He challenged fire and with Jew a lot of boat like. He was a whiny little prick anyway. So, yeah, the modern vampire really comes from Polydori, but he essentially off Barron and then just made the vampire literally Bron and more of the vampire was first published has been by Lord Byron, but poltory later writing to clarifies or or the ship explaining that the story was, quote, founded upon the ground work upon which Byron's fragment was to have been continued. So he sucks off Byron celebrity for his own celebraty. Like, I didn't rip it off, I just found it upon the ground work upon which is fragment. The way, it is like Byron getting his just desserts because he ripped everything off everyone, like he has entire let his being. Like no, I didn't take it from Marlow, which I've never read, and I didn't take it from Gir for, which I also have not read. Yeah, good point, but yeah, so this is often been read as a parody or or satire Byron himself. So when we say vampires are Byron ACK, there they're literally by in a lot of cases, and the vampire is of course alluded to and carpenter them when lad tells agnes that the new vampires prefer vampires with a why, since it's more watered a chuckle out of that, right, the the irony being that it was originally spelled with the why. But I also realize that there's like the emphasis on note spelling, like this definition of labels, Margaret and and Margaret note spelling. Yeah, I guess they're the the baby having notes spelling as a middle name is sort of pointing out at the ways like people trying to find themselves through labels and identity and things like that, and that the vampires are trying to define themselves as modern when the essence of what they're taking is actually old fashioned. I guess. Yeah, okay, yeah, later, when describing the vampires competitive nature, I preshutt also Clara fires that vampires are just the same. That's vampires with the wire just the same as vampires with the eye, the only real difference being they can't spell properly. Except again there there...

...may be bringing back the correct or original spelling. And there's also this idea, like we were talking about quilty modifiers and things, that, like language, evolves. One point they would have been right, now they're not. It's like the progress thing. There's layers, baby, it's a super before we move on from Polidori, they also Polydori's other other thing that he wrote was, how do I say this? Ernest as Bruck told, or the modern oedipus. That was the story he started during the ghost tale competition. Further evidence the Polydoris, a print which, according to the two thousand and seven broad view press edition, scandessly draws and the rumors Barrons affair with his half sister for a fasty and updating of the myth of Edo pus, which he combines with account of the struggle of Swiss patriots against the Napoleonic invasion. I want to bring him back from the grave to punch him. I started reading this and then gave up because it's boring and also just Arelo. But there are explicit references to Memphord in the first chapter. I think I can get through life without knowing. I'm not reading that one. Well, this section is only in here for me to chastise you for not reading this, because I don't know how you can write your your thesis with apt acknowledging this. So don't give a fuck about POLYDORI. But this is a Fassie and updating of the myth of edipus, with references to Mayford written on the other num. As far as say, it's a good one, but it's a thing. What happened? UHHUH. But yeah, although not about Vampires, it does quote a passage from Byron Ski our as an epigraph, but in just to put the nail in the coffin, as it were, to Polydoro being a minor imitator of his companions. In his own introduction to the story, he says I hope the reader will not throw my story away as opposed to Franken style and story. It says, I hope, but they will not throw my story away because it is not equal to the others. Whether the use I have made of Supernatural Agency in the coloring I have given to the mind of an Estis Bruck to old our original or not, I leave to the more errordite in novels and Romances to declare. So, as someone who is errodited in novels and the Romances, I will say the Supernatural Agency is not original and I'm going to throw the story away because it is not equal to the others. Same. Yeah, so that's the origins in in the literary world. But of coause the the other parallel thread running to literature throughout the development of Vampire is the theater by theater, which of course ties into masquerade and then God, that book as the same flashbacks. But yes, well, this all sor like we have their theater and then the films. Is there are these parallel traditions developing. Yeah, that sort of feed off each other, right, very vampire like. Yeah. So poultry's vampire was less popular as a story that it was as a plain it became extremely popular through through theatrical adaptation, so that by one thousand eight hundred and twenty, just a year after it was first published, there were three separate adaptations showing in France, the most popular, which the Troy Vampires. So I guess that's the three vampires followed the adventures of a Byron fanatic who decided to treat the lovers of these two daughters and his mate as if they were vampires, which predictably culminated in a trull marriage. I know what could could be some connection to man, for there the first ever vampire novel, Lord Ruthven, who their vampires, which was dedicated to Lord Barron, was also published the same year. But the most faithful of the eighteen twenty theater will adaptation live vampire note spelling with an eye by Charles Nodia, was rewritten by Three Musketeers, author Alexander Dumas in one thousand eight hundred and fifty one there during US also writing a sequel to Poldo's vampire called the return of Lord Ruffin the same year, and also he wrote a novella called the Paleface Lady, which is set in the Carpetian mountains, which bram stoker references in his notes to drag or. So this is mede. You, we get the origin of Transylvania as part of the Vampire Myth, which is also mentioned in the story, a contemporarious story called the mysterious stranger. So this is where we're getting these aspects of the myth that often associated with Dracula, bleeding in a for dracula, but also based on and Rothren and Polidori's work. But yes, the next most significant literary work of vampire fiction is the penny dreadful Varney the vampire, which is variously attributed to James Melbourn, Rama or Thomas Peckett prest. I think I've worked this out, since I right there. So at the time was published as by Thomas Peckett pressed and then later was credibly shown to have been written by Rama. So nowadays, even though the original pamphlets, I'll say by Thomas Peckett. Pressed nowadays it's pretty it's well accepted that binny the vampire was written by James mcamrama, that if polar or is vampire, was based on Barro and then, as Lisa Le Doucer observes, finally, is surely the first story of note to use the historical counts of Vampires and that had been published in the early eighteen hundreds as its basis, arguing that Varney de fire is defined by self loathing. That is solidified in and Rice's vampire chronicles and the cane wandering jue stereotype. W Hoop. I'll go through all that in a second, Chris. Since writing this I got got down the Barney rabbit hole because no one's read Vanney because it's three volumes of eight hundred page bullshit chapters. If you want an abridge version, email me,...

...because I've spent the last month going through that first volly event a bridging it into one hundred sixty page readable sort of novel style version, which has been fun and a better way to process the story than actually reading it, I think. But there's a lot here like this is not a good book. This is written as a page dreadful to just be chapters that don't make any sense, as the dialogs horrible and things. But there's a lot of interesting stuff going on in Varney, which I'll come back to you later. But as has le Doucer's alluding to, hear a lot of the stuff we associate with the modern, hyper byronic vampire. There is the Broody, self loaving and right style vampire actually comes in this Varney the vampire story which ends like he commits suicide. He throws himself into a volcano because it's all too much. Right, Literal Volcano? Yeah, Li'sure volcano in this thing the predates Dracula by like thirty years or even more forty, forty to fifty years, and then was just and was incredibly popular at the time. Like apparently this is one of the best selling Penny dreadfalls ever and it was just forgotten because it was bad. Well, it's just that the form is unreadable. Right. It's like a soap opera sort of thing, where ostensibly readable if you're getting it in the paper each week and it's ten pages like. I mean even then like it, it becomes very padded but yes, again, I I've made a nice, nice little bridge version if you're interested. Are But the aristocracy thing right, this is all about the aristocracy, like because Vanni is a vampire terrorizing this household and trying to prey on the virgin daughter and everything, but not to get her blood. It's because he wants to scare them out of the House so he can sell their house for money, because he owes a guy, because he's like more of a werewolf sort of thing, where like he can be revived if he's dragged into the moonlight. But again, that's sort of that's how Lord Rutherfam and August stabler revived by moonlight as well. It's Heath Cliffy as well. then. Okay, like about money and inheritance and trying to get power of it's very heathy. What is weathering heights? One thousand eight hundred and forty seven. So this begins before weather in heights but ends after it. There you go. That too must have like there must have known each other. I mean he's not as like scheming and debious, like in control as heathcliff he's like sort of this bumbling gothic villain and sort of guy. He does have trapdoors and disappears out windows and things. But yeah, brings in that self loading thing because he is like himself tormented because he owes this guy money, because he paid him to put him in the moonlight so we wouldn't die. And then this guy comes back and hears him a debt and it's all about like class distinctions, as it's like sort of like a comedy of manners and it has a lot of stuff like the scene where from carpet juggling where the mob shows up to the gate and they don't know what they're doing and it's all superstition. Stuff like that happens in Vanni, the vampire like there's some some chapters are like comedy satires about like the Townspeople Gossiping and the story getting out of hand to the point where they're erecting. It's it's not a good read. It's a very interesting read if, like, you're interested in vampires. I am like fully on the campaign for people need to read any if they're interested in vampires because, like they just got so it's too long, it's too hard, but it's such a crucial part of the story. I think, yeah, so it was out of print for like a hundred years until I was first very published in one thousand nine hundred and seventy three in a two version of volume, right before interview with the vampire. So I'm going to come back to some vanny things. When we talk about that and rise read it, we don't know. Okay, she's dead now, so we kind of ask a m with yeah, this has been forgotten to scholarship and popular culture because in the folklore of disc world, Pratchett and Simpson jumped straight. They say there was Lord Roughn, then there was Carmella and the S. right, we're skipping that entire midsection where there's all these what we would think of as like pulp fiction vampires are at these trashy newspaper serials. So yeah, some of some of the characteristics of Vanni that he brings in are that this introduces the telltale sign of the two bloody bite marks on the neck of the victim. There are things like sleepwalking, the different discussions of the different ways to kill vampires mobs. You've got the transformation into a wolf. I think about Varney too, though, is he's ugly, like he's not a hot swab guy. He's like this ugly Old Lord. So yeah, it's interesting. Yeah, more significant or more remembered is Camilla, who is a referenced in Carpet Jugon. We have aren't Camilla, a very severe woman in a figer hugging black dress and deep plumb lipstick who was said to bathe in the blood of up to two hundred versions at its time? What's six times too, like a hundred and twenty liters of blood. How many leads a bathtub, because that's probably just a bathtub and that equals two hundred Bergens. The other thing is it is bathing and blood thing because, like in the story, Comilla like she's in the blood in the coffin, but that's like the ghostly blood of her victims. This whole bath very bathing a blood thing. It's not really a thing in any vampire fiction, except the ones that are specifically about bathroom. Seeah, where you do get references to battery, the nine sea in an Australian film first, which is a really cool science fiction cattle dystopia. I do recommend that film. It's very interesting. But they're also not real vampires. There people who are imitating vampires to try and bring back bathteries descendants. Camilla does bathe in blood in one of the best vampire movies, vampire, a hunter deep blood lust, and is in some of the sevent he's vampire films, such as counterstracular, daughters of darkness and a moral...

...tales. But outside of all of these fairly minor examples and carpet juggler itself, it's not actually a common trap of Vampire fiction. Okay, it's one of those things that everybody knows about biapires that, when you look at the literature in the film's never actually happens. Yes, Camilla, for those who don't know, is a it's not a short story. It's like a novella, small novel Nova. Yeah, that was later collected into made into a collection its own. NOVELA works from one thousand eight hundred and seventy two by Irish author Joseph Sheridan Le F a knew, which is where you get lesbian vampires from. Right. This is the the girl who comes in and seduces the daughter. It's interesting because, as I just talked about recently, it's like her. She is she's beautiful because she's sublime, like it brings the two things together. So it's interesting the woman element there. We also get the introduction here of Common Vampire Troupe, which is the Anagram or because of the famous one being dracular, an alley card, which is first used in universals one thousand nine hundred and forty three. Film Son Of Dracula, which the movie they're literally opens with Van Housing pointing to the Anagram on it's like a luggage tag on a train, and he's pointing to an Egos Alle you card spells drugtula. So it's like it's not a mystery. There's the jokey and arm thud, the discod novel Thud later vines when he's recruiting a vampire. They've spelled their name backwards and there's a desire any of like did they really think that fools anyone? But like that is embedded in the fiction, like where it starts. Like all, you can't never foold anyone. But yes, and Camilla, you have. Camilla is the Anagram of Countess Melacha. Sorry, that's something that Camilla introduces. I was going to mention Dr Acula from scrubs, but I don't care. So the thing that's hilarious. I've never watched scrub so that's funny. Yeah, he know that's his. He's writing a screenplay. It's like a running joke that he's adding a screenplay throughout the series called about a vampire doctor called Dr Acular. The solution to every every illness is a blood transfu USUAN. Yeah, that's funny. SCRUBS is very funny, but it has aged poorly. Yeah, that's pull me Han, in his very good twenty fourteen book the Vampire and Science Fiction, Film and Literature, points out. Left on me was later framing of Camilla as part of the journals of a cult detective. Dr Martin Has Celsius in his short story collection in a glass darkly from one thousand eight hundred and seventy two. Also makes her Celsius the first man of science to be connected with Vampiresm in horror literature, providing an obvious blueprint for stokers, Van Housing and the slew of psychic sluts and scientific ghostbusters that follow, which are parodied and subverted in carpet jugger. Right, I think we're going to talk more about mode Ley oats and his whole thing. I wonder if we revisit him when we get to small guards and talk more about omnimism. So maybe we'll come back to him there. But yeah, the idea of the scientific investigation of Vampires Actually Predates Dracula as well, but there's no dancing around it. DRACULA'S THE BIG ONE. So why don't we talk about Dracula, written by Bram Stoker, published in one thousand eight hundred and ninety seven, so right at the turn of the century there, because the story about modernization and progress, as we discussed. See, yes the traditional portrait of Dracula is alluded to, a carpet juggling, by the portrait of a tall, thin, gray haired man and evening dress and a red lined cloak. He looked quite distinguished in a distant aloof sort of way, and there was the glimmer of a length of canine on his lower lip. So this is there the common view of Dracula, which, as much as Bella go see as the go to guy. I think this picture particularly especially, just referring to color, because the goosy films are in black and white. So red lined cloak, this is referring to the Hamma horror films of the s which, having been watching them more recently, it really is quite amazing, like just how much of the cultural image of draft is drawn from that one specific film and film franchise. But yes, IN GOING FORTH TO DRACULA WE NEED to go back to Barron, because there may have been a, if not direct, a fairly predominant indirect byronic influence, or Byron influence I should say, on Ram Stoker while he is Writing Dracula, as the editors of the two thousand and eight McFarland facsimilar edition of Bram Stoker's notes for dracker, Robert Eighteen bissaying and Elizabeth Miller observed, the Bram stoker followed the literary convention of making his anti hero a member of the aristocracy, as you were saying, joining a plithor of new nasty counts such as those in Redcliffe's mysteries, of you, Dolpho and the Italian Shelley. Is the Sensei Byron's Manford and Polidori's honest spectald. There is my boys. Yeah, this is this character archety right obviously comes from the Gothic Villam but also from the Shelley Byron Romantic tradition. Here there's also count as a von Klucker in the mysterious stranger and Countess Carnstein in left as Camilla, which Predate Dracula. So yeah, this aristocracy thing. I think you were right to pick them up on that because, yes, as much as Dracula is about immigrants, it's also about an upper class thing. And in Stoker's library there were copies of Byron's child Harold's pilgrimage, a coffee of Hoffmann's Weird Tales, which includes the Samman, the Proto Frankenstein story about the Automaton, but not Hoffmann's Vamporismas, which is sort of a an exploration of emperorism. There are two copies of Shakespeare's complete works, the complete works of...

Roberts Lewis Stevenson, a satire of good as faust by FM von Clinger, called Faustus his life and death and descent into hell. Do you know this one? No, I made a note before to help look into it. Okay, and an hunt to copy of Frankenstein, interestingly subtitled the modern man demon, which I thought was interesting because it's sort of makes more explicit rather the original subtitle. The correct subtitles, the one prometheus, the one man demon makes it a satanic story rather than a Promethean story. Yeah, made a note to look into that as well, because it's probably some sort of pirated version where they've just changed it around like this. Happened a lot. So and that these sort of things, like knowing people's libraries and what which pirated addition they have, is what I like to do. So right. Well, yeah, and this is this is interesting to us and perhaps no one else, but this like man demon, because Prometheus is a demigod. So rather than a man God, he is a man demon. This is saying Frankenstein is is evil, he's bad. So that just that that one subtitle can reframe the whole story. Interesting stuff, interesting the editors of the Facsimile addition also suggests that Dracula's diabolical demeanor may have been inspired by the English stage actor Henry Irving, who was famed for his ability to capture the awful horror of the theater's great films, including an especially foust who reportedly played almost eight hundred time. With a deleted scene from Toga. Stuff type script also referring to the figure of mustofile. He's in the Opera Nice. So yeah, we really guard getting this, like the buyer, the Byronic, romantic gothic sort of tradition clashing with a bit the theatrical one, like when I was sort of picking up on the parallels between the Phantom of the Opera and Vampires and Dracula when we were discussing masquerade. That's really because, like so much of Dracula comes from the theater. Yeah, both like in its adaptations, but also, yeah, we're seeing that it was maybe influenced by dat or presentations as well. Some other literary influences beside Byron I sort of hard to identify right stocker's notes do not mention any of his literary inspirations, but the exception of Car Milla, and it's difficult to pinpoint any exact sources. It seems likely that he would have read Vanney, given how popular it was. It's also likely that he read theophile Gautier's La Morte Aramuse, translated as Clarimond in one thousand eight hundred and eighty two, which has three vampire women. So the bribes of Dracula perhaps comes from that story, and also the Transylvanian setting perhaps comes from the mysterious stranger as well as doing us. But the mysterious, the Vare paric protagonist of the mysterious stranger is also a tall, Pale, thin aristotic vampire called Azer von Klattka, who has super human strength, does not eat ordinary food, inhabits are remote castle that is surrounded by wolves under his control and has an affinity with bats. He can become a cloud of mist, can enter dwellings only after being invited in and inspires a mixture of attraction and repulsion in his victims, producing a state of lethargy, and is pursued by a fearless vampire, our hunter. So is that? This is pretty like spot on that that's Dracula right. Yeah, Dracula was maybe not this big original thing, like we're sort of getting a pastichea. Yeah, I'm really in a pasta at the moment's sign to pastache right now. So deep infestation. So when, like an you think about things get lost of time, like all we were remember of the Nightti, even vad he's been lost. It's just Dracula Camilla and may be rough and, if you like, into it, but there were, there were all these things that stoker was taken from this wasn't some kind of like spontaneous inspiration, and Drugula has gone on to be the the definitive vampire archetype, I mean the modern vampire, in the ear twilight romantic vampire, but also your modern, brooding, sympathetic Byronic Vampire, is pretty far removed from this original Gothic Villam Dracula sort of thing because, as lad says in carpet Juggulin, he says we won't see. He's luck again with any luck. So another sort of illusion, or an apocryphal illusion that we get to Dracula in Carpet Juggulin is that one of the main vampires is called flat right, which is an illusion to flood tapash the this is flad the Impala, Who Dracula is reputedly based on and in a lot of modern vampire fiction is equated with right. And in Foclore of discold pressure, Simpson state that's stock, a stoled account's name from the real life flat dracul also knows that Tepeesh the impaler one of the great warrior princes of Romanian history. This is one of those things everybody knows about vampires that Pratchett is citing or quoted without citation because Star grendeed discovered the name Dracula in William Wilkinson's account of the principles of Lachia and Moldavia, which claims that I least, King of Hungary, preparing to make war against the Turks, engaged roode Dracula to form an alliance, his troops ultimately being joined by four thousand relations under the command of Draculus son cool. So what Wilkinson's claiming here is that Dracula in the walation language means devil, the surname being given to any person who rendered himself conspicuous by the courage cruel actions of kind. So this is the mighty warlow Dracula, and this is lad Tepesh that Wilkinson's text is talking about. As the editors of Stoker's notes point out, though, the three instances of draculam Wilkinson's texts refer to different people.

They referred to flood Tepesh, but also his son, who was also named Lad. Yet Wilkinson never refers to them by name as of LAD, only by Dracula and the Voivo, and the word draculad never appears in any other sort of cited in Stoker's note. So like, while it's technically correct to say Dracula is based on Flad Theapala like not really took the the name from a historical title and that is it. So this is one of those things everyone knows about vampires that that isn't technically true. Yeah, the idea that Dracula was based on Vloodier Pale was popularized by the academic Rodu Floresco in his one thousand nine hundred and seventy two book in search of Dracula. Now, Rdu Flescar, I have a particular bird to pick with, because he's the dipple guy. Analysis nodding knowingly, but rudder FLUOROSCO gets big off this book that says, Hey, I found this cool thing where draculas based on on Vladim. Hey Up later, like twenty or thirty years later, I think it's in the nines, he writes another book called in search of Frankenstein, which claims that Mary Shelley specifically based the character Frankenstein on this guy called, I can remember his first name, that he's dipple, who was this like scientist who was reputed to do experiments with body parts at a castle called Castle Frankenstein, which all seems very convenient and neat and good, except there is absolutely no record the shell he's ever knew of this castle or visited everything, and his entire evidence is that, well, they visited a nearby town, so they must have gone there, except that it was like a two day track and they had a night stay over. And he cites secret pages of Mary Shelley and claim on Stle that only he has access to the dirt exist and the things he quotes from the public available versions of they diary are inaccurate. And the guy, I don't know if it's him or if it's another guy that he cites, but someone tied up in all this actually like owns the castle Frankenstein and is marketing it as a tourist attraction. So completely dodgy. Yeah, it just one of those random coincidences. Yeah, so it seems like this the in search a dracula thing. I haven't read it. I did a flick through it, but like his scholarship is trash. But seems like there is something here where he's going through stark his things and during this connection, but then like his leaked to therefore, Dracula is glad the Impala. Yeah, is completely ridiculous and unfounded. In the Frankenstein chronicles dipple is the bad guy, so I don't know, someone must know about it somewhere. Um. Yeah, there's been a few pop culture mentions of it in like the last five years or something, but it did catch on as much as this glad the impaler thing, which enters vampire literature with Fred Savagan's the dracula tape, which we're going to talk about in a bit, and Dan Simmons Children of the night, Oh, which I bring up because the hero, a priest in that book, Michael O' Rock, is an ampute and I just thought that was interesting because we were talking about fan of the upper and how people with disabilities are demonize. This is I have an example of an ampute hero, dragon, vampire slaying priest. So apparently he's in a series of books by Dan Simmons there. Yeah, and then the acknowledgements at the end of this book, children of the night, which is from one thousand nine hundred and ninety two, Simmons says. Finally, I would like to acknowledge my debt to rudder our FLASKA. A Moment Tim mcnellie, who's writings have almost single handedly renewed interest in the Historical Light Dracula, and I recommend their books to the interested reader. Thanks to the research of these men and other scholars, I can see that all the memories I ascribed to Lad Dracula in this book are True Bullshit. Also, who are the other scholars? Come on, give us a proper busiographer, you bastard. Yes, however, Simmons does clarify that his one caveat for the Serious Dracula secret is that the caption under the photograph graph of the apparently only excellent bust of lad tapes like Tabish on page a hundred seventy of dracula princes of many faces. This is another book. Version by our FLORISCO about tracula says that the statue is to be found in the village of Coppon tiny, but in truth the bust is to be found not in the shadow of Castle Dracula but across from the old palace grounds, Integra Estate. So I'm a hundred kilometers away. We going backpacking, or we're going to say this bust. Well, we're not, because it's not near the the dracular castle. This is the same thing as Mary Shelley at it must have visited the castle. He's going. You must read this book. Everything that's true and that's why I can say my historical fiction is true, but then goes up. But this one thing is wrong by a hundred case. See. That's why I'm really, really suss about this full of the House of Firon Book. Like did he eat his so I don't know. Do you want to hear and tell us the story about the eating the dog? So Byron, famous Byron's Great Grandfather, Jack was like the second or the second son, and he joins the navy at seventeen and his first all first voyage gets shipwrecked on an island in the middle of but fuck nowhere, and they starve for a year and then finally some natives help them out and they kind of make their way home and it takes him five years to get home. He's this long lost brother who eventually turns up and he has all these amazing stories. However, that first year of starvation really did a number on him, because he goes off into the Bush one day and he kind of comes back with this dog and he has this great friendship with this dog and it's always trotting around after him, and then one day the other like seamen enter his tent and they're like give us the dog and he's like no, and then they take the dog by force and at this point I'm crying and they eat the dog and then he goes with them and eats the dog too, because that's how hungry he is,...

...and like he feels bad. But then a week later they didn't eat the pause and they kind of left them to rotten this and he goes back and he did it. Says devours the pause, and I'm just like well, that's enough for tonight. So that's some great stories about all the Byrons, who were all bastards, but that one really hit home. While we're on it, I've got a nerve here. I want to know more about byrons blood bowl, oh yeah, which is something you bring up on that man for an episode of the Devil's Party. But tell us about barrons blood ball. Okay, so byron catches his favorite Miss Loongi. Obviously one of the one of the so called cures for fevers back then was to just bleed people that this was their the fixl and they took something like four leaders of byrons blood and you have six leaders in your body and there's a painting. I don't know that it's real or whatever, but here there's this large porcelain bowl that Byron is being like dramatically drained into, and I don't know if the bowl is real, but Josh's Golond on twitter is like this is the Holy Grail of Romanticism when we need to find byrons blood. Bawl. Yeah, I want to write some kind of like Romantic Byron Vampire historical fiction novel called Ready Player one. Let Me my other fun Byron Story while we're here is that I have a pirated addition, a Galignity addition of Byron, which is very cool. But in it is a newspaper clipping from a while ago. They pulled up Byron's body to check which of his legs was the deformed one, because apparently they'd forgotten or didn't keep records or something. Turns out it was his third leg. Is His third leg? I don't remember now, but yeah, they go Dudley, dudd leader. Good do I think that was horrible, but good. I don't know. Maybe it's the zoom delay it's had a way out of time for me, but we have an excuse because is I sound like shit because I'm locked in a closet and Alice has covid so it's been a week since her requitted the first half and things have happened. I'm every house moving lungs, moving lungs, I don't know, I'm getting some new ones. That's the kind of Covid wit you can expect. So, like much where we're at there is the start of the the twenty century. Well, yeah, because we got through the nineteen century last time, although I think we started in like the fourteen hundreds technically. So we got through a fair bit and now we want to look at sort of the the twenty century modernization of the vampire. That's what we're here to talk about. Yeah, so I think we got UP WE GOT UP TO DRACULA. Essentially. We went through Dracula, which is eighteen ninety seven, so right at the end of the nineteen century, and we talked about how that is dealing with the modernization of the Victorian era and coming into the twenty century and everything there. As far as books and things go, there isn't really much at all during the first half of the twenty century until like that, our ten s and S, where you start to get some innovations out. Some notable books in that period that I just wanted to point out because I thought they were interesting. There's Bram stoker second novel, the layer of the white worm, which isn't a vampire novel but like kind of is from one thousand nine hundred and eleven. Did you know this one, Alice? No, I'm I'm sitting here going Bram stoker should have stopped. Shouldn't be this time. He should have one this yeah, yeah, because this book has a reputation as being one of the worst books ever written. I made a couple of attempts and gave up and then just listen to the three hundred seventy two pages will never get back. Oh God. They go through it and it's not as bad as some of the stuff they do. This is a podcast that goes through bad books that I've been listening to recently. Yes, not as bad as some of the stuff they do, but it sounds it's very boring. There's a whole bunch of stuff about a monger, so he follows that up and it's sort of the white worm is is the white monster and it's why? Because there's clay and there's like a lady who might be a ghoster of vampire, but then I don't think she is. It's really dull. It was made into a movie, Starr, you grant, and I think in the ninety so the it sounds like the title of a porno as well. They are of the five is my plants. That's what I thought when you first said it. I'm like, Oh, we're moving into the porn addition of the farm. I think you could be wrong. White Worm, I don't know. It might the rule rule forty five of the Internet. Everything is Paun or something. I would know if there is something, there is a porn version of it. Oh, yeah, that's it. Yeah, but I don't know. I think maybe you too revealing a bit more about nick there, if you'll go too for white word. Okay, there's also the book Lilith by George Knold from one thousand eight hundred and ninety five, which does Predate Dracula by a couple of years. But I wanted to bring this up for a couple of reasons. One, George McDonald was the guy who wrote the Gobbler book that we worked about. That I then went read and was really boring and not interesting. But I read this book and this books really interesting because it's called Leth and that's another thing we talked about. And this book it's sort of like a precursor to the...

...chronicles of Narnia to the point where, I think C S Lewis has said, this is a direct influence on on the crowns and I because it's about duty who goes through a coup to another world, so the white which there is lith and she is a shape shifting vampire cat lady. So sort of some HG wells onland of Dr Row Leopard Panther Lady stuff going on. So yeah, between for like about fifty years or so, between Dracula, which is on thous eight hundred and ninety seven, and probably, I am legend in fifty four, which is the next significant influential vampire novel, there really isn't anything. You do get a bit of development in the pulp novels. I think lovecraft has a couple of vampire stories and you get see our Moore's Shambleau, which is sort of a science fiction feminist subversion of vampire troops. That is maybe the start of the like vampires from space trope. That is is a pretty minor thread vampire fiction. So yeah, you get these sort of pulpy stories but no significant long form literary works for about Fifty Years Right, which is quite a gap, especially when you consider how prevalent vampire fiction is now and during the second half of the twenty century. What are prevalent and significant during the early half of the twenty seventh century, though, of course, are the movies. Okay, the earliest and most significant of which is, of course, the German film Noz Fartu from one thousand nine hundred and twenty two, which is turning a hundred this year. There's lots of Nos Ferratu things out there in the vampire academia land or conferences and things like. We're celebrating as far ato and yeah, I think I think we mentioned this in the first part, but not for our two. You haven't seen a heavy else. Nope, it's very good bys the the character account all lock their vampire from that movie is referenced in Cuppa Juggulum. There the the strogoy painting of the Vampire with the bold head in the dark room, staring eyes and two teeth like needles and the ears like Bat Wings, and fingernails that hadn't been trimmed for years. This is counterblock from Nos Ferrato, which do you do? You know about Nos Ferrato, like just in general, what it is? Yeah, you don't know. You don't. The fingers, creepy fingers, yes, the fingernails, or it's coming. He's on my vampire should what I have? Oh, cool, yeah, it's IT'S AN ANNOTATION OF DRACULA, but they couldn't get the rights because, while there were, it's a small, like independent German studio essentially, but they made it anyway because I like screw you. whichever. The the stories all kind of modeled and and I haven't looked into it that well, but their general like gist. All. The legend of it is that the stoker estate sued them into oblivion to the point where the film, all copies of the film, were ordered to be destroyed. Wow, that's dramatic. Yeah, and until like the digital age, this film was not widely available. Right, because there are a few surviving copies, but there's no way to distribute them. Until it went out of copyright and also like there was the technology to produce my to copies of it. So I don't remember when it got brought back, but I I sort of remember there being a time by all my God and US Arriti is available and then I watch that. It's very good. There are. So offers us a bit of a connection to fan of the opera, keeping with the which is series Pratchett theme here, because in the Andrew p Williams one thousand ninehundred and ninety six article reviewing the sexual other in the fan of of the opera and Asserrato, as they know, the first significant film adaptations are both Dracula and the fan of of the opera being nice Arrato and the universal fan of of the Oppera film from from Nineteen and twenty five. Are there. There is a lost silent phatom of the opera film from one nineteen and sixteen, but the first influential and available one is the universe one from nineteen twenty five. But the and NOS Rieti William says each illustrate challenges to Patriarchal Sexual Authority from horrifying others who must be eradicated in order to preserve the restrictive codes of sexual purity. So yes, I thought that was interesting. They're just essentially saying that the fan of the opera is a vampire in everything but like blood sucking. This also offered us a connection back to CARPA Jugulum in that, yeah, they're what Williams is saying is the enemies in these movies, a counterlock, and the fan of the opera represent this, like infringement on the sexual order for A. Well, I think we were saying in the first part about how Dracula is the patriarchal order, but he's also like a foreign patriarchal order rights, he's a patriarchal threat to the patriarchy, that these characters also represent that, which isn't really saying much, given that the at a man and not Straw, who are inspired by Jacula by so I guess that sort of points toward granty being the Virgin Crowne and Agnes being the Virgin who resists is. These are the characters that have power and carpet Jocko to actually fight the vampires. But, by the way, I we're talking about granny being like hardcore because she is both the Virgin and the crone. He'lda is kind of like that. It was characterizes that and Sabrina and don't like they don't make anything of it. They just kind of hint that all she's more powerful for these things. And then she gets married and it's strange and I'm like, HMM, Josh stuff. That's who. Who is? Hilda? TILDA is one of Sabrina's aunts. There's elder and Hilda, right, and she's the really fun one who works at the Comic Book Store and falls in love with the dude who tend actually has...

...a sex team and trapped inside of him. So as you do. Yeah, and she gets married. So she marries Atentialis them right, because that's sort of the signaling her becoming the mother. Yes, yeah, just says this whole sequence where they go forward in time and Sabrina Has a vision and she sees what happens to everyone and it's and that's how they get the three in one. From there she's like, oh, that's how we defeat whoever they would defeating at the time, as we have to bring our power together as three and one, and they just grab people from each of the three and I'm like, why not just get everyone anyway, made mother, Crowne. What charmed has taught me is that you don't need made mother and crown, you just need three hot chicks. HMM, okay, I mean, I guess pipe is the mother, but I wouldn't describe any of them as crowns or virgins. Also, there's just not like virgins hanging around in my street to be used and spell. So well, you don't know that. I'll go. I'll go do another thing right after. Williams also connects this idea of charges to the patriarch or order, to Frankenstein, in which they say men undertake the female role of human reproduction, comparing it to Dracula, where in the vampire combines feminine with Masculine Sexual and emotional characteristic, the fan of the opera, where women see their own cultural position mirrored in the form of the and treatment of a monster, and I think that's really reaching. I'm glad you said that. I was like this. I'm going to have a disagree, but I don't have the energy to disagree. Yeah, I agree. I think that's some Gilbert and Gibar Bullshit. There is definitely some Gilwood and Gubar Bullshit, but you do get a lot of I think the reason why I've put this here is that you do get a lot of scholarship these days and commentary like pointing out Dracula as a what's the word and Drogynus so or in some ways hermaphrodic, but like people are projecting a sensuality and a and and an androgynous quality onto them. Like there's a lot of readings of like, oh, he's not only seducing Mina and and what's her name? Lucy? Yeah, also Jonathan. Yeah, right. There's all the stuff about like he's Sducing Jonathan, and I think that is one hundred percent retrospective projection from like a modern point of view, where vampires are bisexual and sexually, Dracula is not sexy, in seductive and he's a spooky dude. Yeah, like, and I think he's very specifically male in the way that he spooks. It is a very patriarchal vibe. He's a patriarchal threat. He's a threat to the patriarchy, not because he subverts it in some kind of cow part like hermosexual way, mm, in that he is like a more virile patriarchy. So he's the traditional gothic villain, not the modern take on the Gothic Villain, which is saying yes, well, he he's I don't think he's Byronical. He is a gothic villain who, as we're going to discuss it, and gets borronized in the mid twentieth century. And then I think all these modern readings are then projecting that on to Dracula. So, yeah, I think this is maybe we're all ratings are valid, but they're not necessarily accurate. That's a nice way of putting it. Or do that with that your twelve teachers. So it's not sparkly, all right. Yeah, and then, of course there is the universal series of jacular films, beginning in one Thousan nine hundred and thirty one with the Yeah, just called Dracula, the film that Starts Bella go see, who famously does not drink wine. So yeah, but I'm going to talk more about these in the bronus episode I'm going to do with Maddie where we go through all the movie so we'll talk more about that there. But that's what's shaping vampire culture during the first half of the twenty century. But, as we can see, there's a all just ITERATIONS OF DRACULA. Right, there's there's no innovation going on, there's no reimagining, it's just dracula, more dracular, another version of Dracula, song and so forth. To the problem where the movie is an adaptation of the play, which is an adaptation of the novel. Right, there's a lot of dilution going on there. But somehow that becomes like the archetypal version, whereas some of the stuff in the book, as will discuss later, is left out of, you know, the the common conception of what everybody knows about Vampires these days. Yeah, no, because I'm going to talk about I keep saying them to go and do a third part of don't I'll either of us. have got us in have it in this. But I wanted to talk about the different tropes and we how where they get introduced along the line. I thought you might have something to say about the evolutionary perspective, the pratchet takes and carpet Jugger, but we'll save that for the other episode, if we do it. But by way of sort of illustrating this point, is that vampires dive from sunlight, right, yeah, but they didn't until no Sperato the end of noserati where he opens the the blinds and the sun kills it. Spoilers for a hundred year old movie. That is the first time I've vampire ever dies from sunlight as because just the end of the script was missing, like the last few pages of how it's meant to end, and then the do was like quick. And again I sort of believe it because it was like a small just like some dudes making a film in Germany. So like quick rewrite it and they are the not the director of the cinematographer apparently rewrote it and put in the scene of the sunlight killing all. I can him fading out because he just wanted to do this cool new fade out trick that he done on his camera. So it's a technologically prompted rather than like folklore prompted thing. But before that...

...some light had no effect on Vampires. Right and walks around in the day. Varney walks around the day, Dracula walks around in the day. They does, he does, and it does say that he he has none of his powers during the day, but he it doesn't die by some light. But that is now something everyone knows about. Vampires, because in the hammer films they've repribent the curtains and he dies from some but that's not from Dracula's from US Errati. HMM. So, yeah, we'll talk about more things like that in the next part, if we ever do it. Something else that does come in in these films is the eagles. Yeah, I'm in. This is as a Frankenstein thing as well. I think we've talked about it before, but to be briefly rehash and hopefully English, obviously there's no ego and Frankenstein. This is something that's added during the stage adaptations, which I think is when your ego comes in all the together or something. And the same time they make the creature more monsters, they make Frankenstein more evil and less of like an eighteen century rationalists and lightened scientist, and then they get this weird kind of almost caliber, and he actually kind of side kick who is enslaved by Frankenstein and does his bidding. HMM, CALIBAN's an interesting I've had connection that. I want a Calib and this week, well, I had a bit of ego because in among trying to watch a hundred vampire films, I also watched three Frankenstein ones, because they are connected right there. This is the first shared cinematic universe. Is the universal monsters universe, because in house of Frankenstein, the Wolphman, Dracula and Franknstin all overlap the and will discuss more about the eagles when we get to them in the later discod novels. But in regards to the vampire dish tradition, they get introduced through the universal monsters films, first in Frankenstein and then later in the later Dracula movies after the crossover happens. Aren't so? On the folklore of disc weld, Pratchett and Simpson say that there are a few echoes of the Eagles on Earth, and those that are there are only to be found in mode cinema and comic strips, not in age old folklore. However, they do support the idea that any got once worked for a Dr Frankenstein who was definitely crazy, on a job which involved a great deal of stitching body parts together and exposing them to lightning, and that the doctor wouldn't have gotten far without his help. Except the Frankenstein did just fine in the novel, where, as you said, no ego appears, Frankenstein is not crazy. There is no lightning. Right. So this is things everyone knows about Frankenstein now, yes, with the vaults in the neck and the yeah, crazy scientists. Yeah, and watching these movies I was actually surprised by like the the portrayal of the creature is quite sympathetic. Nah, he's not really a monster. They do a train retain his like sympathetic victim stance and not really sure how he became such a monster in popular culture because the movies, yeah, they don't. He is sort of more like the hulk. We're like he goes into rages and smashes things, which he does in the book as well, because he talks and things and he says like I feel bad. He learns to read, he learns to talk and he has like friends and stuff. So I was yet quite struck by how non monstrous the monster is in the movies as well. I wonder if it's because people would see like the graphics from the film and the culture but not actually have watched it or read it or known it. Yes, as you said, the character of everygoing fact originated from the earliest Frankenstein theater adaptation from presumption in or the fate of Frankenstein from eighteen and twenty three, I was later popularized in James Wales. Nine thirty one Frankenstein film where he was called Fritz's had some racist German thing one think. I well, I mean they will probably just picking another German name, because Frankenstein's German, right. Is it an American film? Yeah, so it's interesting though. In one thousand nine hundred thirty one they would join pick of German name. You know. Yeah, maybe good point, something I had thought about. I'm sure there's someone out there's like, yes, that's exactly why they did it, because I know those what. Yeah, there was a while which just picked Japanese names to make good bad guy or whatever, and over in Japan they were like picking, you know, John Spend, the Russian bad guys in and yeah, James Bond during the Cold War and stuff. Yeah, okay, you're probably onto something that. But yeah, the the later non whale directed Franknstein sequels, son of Frankenstein from nineteen thirty nine and the ghost of frankstint fin from nineteen forty two, however, did feature an assistant named Egor. But it's about whether why? So ygo are, who was played by Bellall I go see face for playing drunk. All right, but rather than a hunched over surgeon, as we think of Eagle as these days, he go with the why? In the Frankenstein films is a blacksmith who is a broken neck and a twisted spine as the result of a botched hanging. And by the Fourth Franks I filmed, the ends up having his bringing. He tricks Frankenstein, or by that point it's not Frankenstein because he got burned down. It's like a descendant or relative of Frankenstein, played by the same dude, who's come to like make amends for Frankenstein, who's just Frankenstein. It's whole thing. But he god then manipulates him into Transplanting Eagle's brain into the creature his body so that he can like take over things as the monster. So that's maybe where the more monstrous Brogan start idea comes from. But yeah, that that's also gives us a bit of precedent for Egos. Brain transplants in carpet check of them pretty cool and...

...yeah, they go. Character doesn't appear too often in later stuff outside of these universal monster films is parodied in notorious pedophile room in Polansky's one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven parody film, the fearless vampire killers and the terrible two thousand and fourteen van helsing films. But he's not really part of the cannon anymore. I think he's something that's been left behind but does go on to pay a significant role in the discworld. Books and and the Eagles are really interesting because, as Pratchett and Simpson note, in the folklore of discworld that he goes, general denial of bodily integrity seems to result in a denial of individuality, which gives us an inversion of the traditional gothic characterization of people with artificial implants as villains, which we talked about in the in the masquerade thing which has Peter had you argues in his two thousand and twenty article, Terry Cratchitt's thought experiments about the body also expresses a general desire for a whole body and a fear of losing that ategrity integrity, albeit while also endorsing and participating in Ugit Eugenic and genetic experiments that are banned in most countries. Thoughts. It's there's a lot better. I'm still on the sentence about general denial of but I've had to read that six times. Well, it's like some identity theory stuff, right. The Eagle was like they're not their body, but their whole identity does revolve around their body. Like what makes them an ego is the way they treat bodies. But because the bodies are so disposable to them, that's summoned a Bove wash it. Oh, I think it's more your body is not where it's day car. Yeah, and you ality and stuff, but it's like we don't have time to unpack it here. But there is something really interesting going on with the egos being at once detached from and defined by their bodies. It's quite interesting treating them as disposable but also essential. Project Simpson also argued that the egos solidarity is extended to other living creatures, because what they've regard is valuable is life itself, which of course is interesting to me from an animal rights perspective, although, as Prechen Simpson point out, egos dog scraps and coverage clam is the only example where their general cherishing of life is extended to an animal. HMM. As proten Simpson also point out, Egle doesn't just preserve scraps life, but experiments with the body to make his pet happier. Is it moral to give a dog too tails? Does it want to tails? How? It seems seems like scraps does. Okay, which brings us back to the ORCS, in uncering academicals who are created through ego assisted genetic design and considered inherently, in irreparably evil. The why could they'd been happy about giving them an extra tail? Yeah, HMM. While are they happy with their claws? I don't know. Not. Didn't seem very happy, did he didn't. He didn't. So take away the clause. Moreover, as had you observes, nut is liberated by Iber wolds Vampire Queen League, Lady Mark, a lotter through his cultural education, suggesting that the laks behavior seems to depend on social demands mediated by education more than their physical body. So here again, in that that contrast between the eagles and scraps and and the ORCS, we get this idea of progress right there. Yep. So yeah, practice herning in on there this book with regard to Vampires. But he is doing it. It's sort of like a you know, centurism, sitting on the fence sort of stuff, like what about both sides? Maybe the answers in the middle. But I do think he's given quite a complex critique of these ideas. But to wrap it all up here, Williams, in the article about us right to have the Fami of the opera, also notes that in an often edited out segment, Van Housing ends the movie by saying to the audience, just a moment, ladies and gentlemen, just a word before you go. We HOPE THE MEMORIES OF DRACULA WON'T GIVE YOU bad dreams. So just the word of reassurance. When you get home tonight and the lights of him turned out and you are afraid to look behind the curtains and you dread to see a face up here at the window, why just pull yourself together, remember that, after all, there are such things nic's it, which is like campion and cool, which is what this movie is, but also this is park at the end. It's someone nights dream. Yeah, so we're getting a like it's all a soup, as you say. It's all a mismash of all these things that Prutchett have has been exploring previously in the witch is novels do feed into a vampire literature, and maybe that's only because we're looking for them. These things are so culturally pervasive that if we examined anything, maybe we'd find traces of all these but I do think they're at their reason, like I'm quite struck by the logical progression of the things project Gocery in the witches series that I've never really noticed before. I do think they feed into each other, I guess, like we are Western culture. Like the fact that all the things in western culture keep appearing shouldn't surprise us too much. But yeah, it's beginning to be quite a wide dish of things, so it is surprising. I I why dish, but like also a very narrow like these are the big things that influence everything. Like when you think about the entire history of all culture, that's every reproducing all the things that we don't even know about. But then even the things we think about, like who gives a shit about Percy Shelley these days? Yeah, nobody except fun me, like he was the big guy, he was the pollet, but it was Barron and Mary Shelley who have the like who are still relevant. Well,...

I think he was the big poet in his circle and amongst his people, but he wasn't broadly known. I think that's important as well, like he is appreciated by academics and people who study the poetry of the time, but his influence like broadly, nothing intrinsically. They're little things, like a lot of a lot of poets do take from Shelley, but they have to have read him and been learned and educated, like you can't read it. So true that education like at his time. Ye're not a big deal. I'm still not a big deal because he didn't. He barely sold anything. Mary Shelley sold more from the first addition of Frankenstein then he did in his entire life from many of his poetry. And it's that's very funny. I'm Dracula and Frankenstein, I think, have like a strong claim of something that too, most culturally influential, I think now. I think at the time they would just they were obsessed with part of the mid Lothy and and Scott and going to see Shakespeare. All Right, I think Dracula was pretty successful, like straightaway through the theatrical thing. But yeah, Frankenstein took eighty years to kick in through through the theater and then through movies. Right it's and someone say that's the dilution of culture, but it's also the accessibility in the distribution and things. But for all this, I do think the most influential Dracula adaptation now that it's the Hama Horror Dracula films, which a lot of the stuff in althor. Everyone goes to Legosis as the guy. It really is Christoph Lee who plays our man in the Lord of the rooms films and does have a power metal side project that's a rock opera about the ascent of like kid author and stuffs. The picture we're getting of the old count in coppage of them is very much the Hamahara Dracula as played by Christoph Lieve, which I'll talk about more with Maddie in the the burnus episode about their tracula films, because I've got watched about twelve of have a horror vampire films. That are still about three to go and only like two or three of them verready good. We recorded the first half of the buratus episode where we listened to eighty so you said, and then you're going to push it to a hundred or ninety or but they'd like the extra ten. We like well, how we want to watch all those the Hamma horror ones because we enjoyed the ones to watch and then we watch them all. They're so bad. All right, I haven't known about s Lesbian Vampires, but that is just to say that that was another thing that happened. There were we got movies based on Cammilla. I'll talk more about these in the bronus episode. And and in addition to Lesbian Vampires, the the other threads you get being developed during this gap would get plant vampires, beginning with the man eating tree by Phil Robinson from one thousand eight hundred and eighty one. We do have a reference to watermelon vampires in carpet jug them, which are apparently a thing from four Clare, but I don't know if they've ever made an appearance in our literary work other than Corpa Jack Them. But yes, Cupa Joe and could technically belong to the flat vampire tradition if you want to win folk. That and the space vampires which, as I mentioned, sort of starts with Champlaur and pulp stuff in the only s, but something that's often overlooked, included by myself, until I read a book and was like, Huh, is Warre the worlds is a vampire book. It's the Martians comment space to suckle our blood that do it. That's so it's like it's a pretty obvious one and that predates struck Ala on our Same Years Dracula. It's serialized. So That's interesting to me. And the the other offshoot thread that Pratchett and or I are particularly interested in energy vampires, who are often tied up with the the space vampire stuff. But that the the early significant version of that truck does pretty a jocular and we've mentioned it before. It's to marrows true be from eighteen ninety four, which was of course the the sort of prototype for their family of the opera. So again it's all swirling and coming together. It's barely still around these central influences. But there there are two major developments in the vampire tradition that kick in around the Mid Twentieth Century. Running is the the scientific vampire, which there there are some precursors, but the big one, the early most significant one, is of course Richard Mathieson's I am legend from one thousand nine hundred and fifty four, which I wrote my own this thesis about. Will talk more about that next part maybe, but the point of that book is essentially what's going on in carpet juggling or what Pratchett's gesture towards is. Ever, you read eye legend? No, you sure it's great? That's very short. The main character is a biologist and there's been a vampire plague and then he goes and experiments to work out why all the things that happened to vampires have a why are they scared of Crosses? Why does garlic work on them, and like provide scientific reasons for the way vampires work, which is what Van Helsson's doing in Dracula. But van housing goes to folklore, right, he goes to history and goes will why? Why do...

...they? It's just what garlic works, because garlic has been set to work in folklore, right. And you get the Catholicism that gets brought in with dracular as well, whereas I am legend is trying to a a secular explanations for all the things that happens with Dracula. We're not going to talk any more about that strain with the GRANTU COPPA Juggle, because where that is really influential is zombies like dawn of the dead. Joe Dremrror, the director runner of that film, specifically says I read eye legend and when Burke D or of the dead and a lot of the churches you see there the plagues and the viruses and the scientists are in Zombie fiction. So it sort of breaks off that way. But the other major twenty century intervention in the vampire tradition that comes a little bit later is the rise and development of the sympathetic vampire, which I was going to say is the dominant, but maybe was the dominant. Will come back to that mode of of Vampire and the vampire we would, I think, be most familiar with, for when we're saying people are projecting ideas onto dracula that his this sexy, seductive, gender challenging, troubled character, that's because we've read interview with the Vampire or set in the film or whatever. I know all the things that are in films and projecting back that way. So this is the transition like the Phantom of the opera in that book that we're talking about. This is the transition of vampires from the GOTHIC VILLAIN OF DRACULA TO A sympathetic, seductive victim character, a byronic character, if you will. Yet baby. And as with the Dracula films, this first starts in in a visual medium, with sort of TV sitcoms and characters. So you have the the the film hostess Vampire From One Thousand Nine hundred and fifty, but then you also get sitcoms like the monsters and Adams family from nineteen sixty four and, most significantly, dark shadows from nineteen sixty six. Do you know this one too? Familiar? Without shows? That was I need to go watch all of it immediately. Are you don't? Because there is over a thousand episodes. There are one thousand two hundred and twenty five episodes, thirty spin off novels and two movies, all published between nineteen sixty six and seventy two, and the vampires don't show up until a hundred and twenty episodes in. What the fuck? What do they do? Sorry, it was like an Adams family, like Gothic, because Adams family doesn't have vampires in it. It's the idea that like months month, does a real and they live in a family. Yeah, but they're like non threatening, right, they're like us. It's the domestication of monsters and things, but in terms of vampires. So that dark shadows was just like a Gothic Sitcom. is about a family or a girl who friends out that she she versus mansioned, the Collins Mansion, or Collins would, I think it's called. And Yeah, they're just stuff happens. Goth Shit happens, right, I'm sure you could tell me how it's all connected to you, dolpher when and Jane austen and things. But no one liked the show. Was Crap, right, it's going to be canceled. So they started doing something like let's have a bit of fun and they introduced a character, the vampire bottamas Collins, who's introducing episode two hundred and eleven, so two hundred episodes into this one twelve hundred episode series, and he was originally intended as a villain. He's a big rip off of Viney. He's entire storyline where he's introduced and he's trying to acquire this manner that has a portrait that resembles him, because it was him from years ago. This is all of Ourni, the vampire, but botomus was so popular, but rather than killing them off, they renewed the show and he became the main character and became a sympathetic vampire who was like struggling with his addiction to blood and was striving to find a cure to his curse, like often through science of thing, and he has a whole stuff with he's frequently pitted against his ex lover, the which Angelique Cou cursed him and turned him into a vampire. Wait, did you watch all these? I watched the original arc where bottoms collins is introduced, as like ten or so episodes. They they are like fifteen to twenty minutes long, but they're they're very slow. It is soap opera pacing. There's thank you. Yeah, and then there is the Tim Burton murky from whenever's Johnny deppon stuff, which is bad but not as bad as you think it is, and that that sort of life gives you the no, it doesn't even give you a good version of the story. Yeah, Sir Bottoms Color Collins, played by Jonathan Fred is introduced episode two thousand and eleven, because one observes, colon is arguably the first vampire to be given a history and a complex personality. Besides his blood thirst, he has a moral sensitivity, the ability to share great passion and love and is the victim of great suffering. So it's just the bionic veril hero. But he could drink blood. Okay, well, that's the thing he has to like. That's his greats but he's said he's troubling. Iguably the first vampire, arguably the first bionic hero who drinks blood. Get it, I've just reversed it as all I did, because why? The Lord Ruthan's face on Byron, that Lord roughs that he's b ironic in the sense that he's like he's a Dick like Byron. But he's not. He is Barny, he is Byron. Yeah, no, he's not sympathetic. Apparently, at one point buttamas actually manages to escape being a vampire for a little bit while by siphoning off his curse...

...into a Frankenstein creature. I haven't watched this one, but that is a complete roup off of the nineteen forty five universal film house of Drak. Look what that already happens in, because you do get a bit of Drag Dracula in the Wolf Fan all looking for a cure in that one, but then it turns out they or well, actually I think the Wolfman's a good guy, but draculas like still being a bit of a villainess herd who was trying tracking everyone all along. So he's not sympathetic. But you do get these ideas creeping in. But dark shadows and bottles comes as the first early taken and run with it as a prolonged story. But he was killed off at the end of the one thousand nine hundred and seventy movie spinoff house of dark shadows by having a wooden steak driven through his back, which is a intensely gory scene. I can watch. This movie is very violent, but his body transforms into a bat and then vanishes in a post credit scene. Okay, this is seven years before that, mcu, or whatever. Forty years maybe. I don't that a time estimates. He was meant to be revived in the sequel but for it the sick of playing the role, so it never happened. Say He's maybe the first and a big deal at the time. But like we were saying before, and no one remembers dark shots now, and if they do they think it's a Shitty Tim Burton movie. The the similar to vampire there, of course, was most influentially popularized in and Rice's nine, nineteen and seventy six novel interview with the Vampire. But before we get onto that, there there was in one thousand, nine hundred and seventy five novel called the Dracula tape by Science Fiction Author Frederick Thomas Sabahagan, say Behagen, I think it's pronounced. This is a book about Dracula telling his prospective of brand service, sorry, into a cassette tape. This is just like the the rewriting of twilight and fifty shades from the dudestive. But like what a hundred years a wow. They also cover that in three seventy two pages. But yeah, there's that. But it's also it's a lot like interview with a vampire, which is about a ver by telling his side of the story to a take recall, so that you're right. Yeah, it's Um, I'm like a rust's book there, which is like this broody story, Byronic story, the dracular tape is kind of like, I don't know, it's really funny. I found it really funny, but that's because I listened to the audiobook and I think the narrator was maybe doing a lot into that. But there's some funny stuff in there where like Dracula's excuse and of course he's a what's the word untrustworthy narrator, unreliable and reliable narrator, and maybe he's telling this story to sort of like, you know, as propaganda, but like he's like no, no, I wasn't trying to attack people and get into the house and I and I was prevented from invitations. They were having a heart attack and I was desperately trying to get in but I couldn't because no one would invite me. So I turned into a wolf, so who would invite me? And then and then I had to own them into vampires because Van Housing and we got around given everyone blood transfusions before we knew about blood types and been messing the whole thing up. So van helsing's the the real villain here. Yeah, it's. But there's like funny stuff where he gets caught on the train by a conductor with like all his classkets and he's luggage and they're like why away, let's with all these coffins and he's like I'll know that they're not coffins. Their garden closets. His wife like just restrict clothed storage to the house when I have garden closets, and he's like clinging as an entrepreneur things. I think it's meant to be like pretty timy, Tony and cheek and I had a good time with it. So I recommend that if people are interested. I can see you like reading it and sort of rolling your eyes if you take it on face value, but I think if you've read it as like a satire, it's pretty good. But yeah, this book comes out run year before and Russ's interview with the Vampire, which also had the vampire telling his story to a tape recorder. And, as Melton notes, so Reagan's Dracula differed strongly from both dark shadows and and Rust's vampires. He had no problem with his vampire state, nor anguish about his uncontrollable drive and no wish to change. He manifested little ambiguity in his situation being here, who's moral situation was rather clear. So yes, he's not doing the whole or where was me. He's just like no, it's call being a vampire. Yes, he is vibing and thriving. There are nine sequels written to this book, the first of which I've just started reading today, which is called the homes Dracula file, and he guess is what that's about. Something should be illegal. Okay, yes, so this is racular shock Holmes. No, to solve a crime? Is it just a thing in tracular law? As far it's been pretty fun. I actually think I wonder if it's a if it's dracolo who's been kidnapped and Shearlock Hermesax have the saving. But there are nine sequels which I believe Sherlock Holmes is a recurrent character. So there is something about Dracula's and Sharlock Holmes is. There's a there's a role playing game called all like a Improv comedy game called for Sherlock Holmes is one of which. He was a dracula. No, it's just like you doing Improv. See you and know the end. You have to get switch show. Hermes was a DRACUL. My God. The Adventures are forecast has some some good episodes where they play that. But yeah, there were nine sequels to the drag colot table in between one thousand nine hundred and seventy eight and two thousand, Save Hagan dying into...

...two thousand and seven. So you kept driving them up until his death. Pretty much. Imagine being the wife of that man. Like honey, could you go out and get a banking job so we can raise our family or something other than peanuts? All right, if you able to keep writing them for sale long, that's just thinking that, but yeah, I'd that he's very rich, I guess from inheritance. I don't know. No one knows about this book except for me. So I kind of been too successful. Far More Popular and well Nartas interview with the Vampire, which has does does a couple of influential things. So, along with the characterization of the Vampires itself, this book is called from the first person, which the dracular table was as well. But until then all these stories are from the outside of people seeing their fires and describing them as monster us. Like the first step of simplification here is telling it from the first person perspective. So like we get a bit of that incarpa Juggle and where we get like the Vampires monologging about what they're doing. But it might be quite different if we got like a story from their point of view. Perhaps. Yeah, yeah, frank stain to get the creature's perspective, and I think it's a thing. That's cool. Well, it took about hundred fifty years ago. What are we doing this with Vampires as well? Yes, our Rice's vampires are pretty definitively by Ronnick. Their sexy, they're tortured, they're gay or bisexual, Bibin and thriving. Yeah, there are. There's of course. They're the famous norm McDonald review of interview with the Vampire, which is that it's not gay enough. But yeah, that's that's the film. In the books, the sequels at least, it's very explicit that Lewis and Lewis and will statur lovers. Hears that is bisexual, although when I two thousand eliven interview called Ed Rice on sparkly vampires. Sorry, this is her response to twilight, true blood and levels, it says errors. Claims that this, like homosexual subtext, was not deliberate. I mean, I guess until the sequels where she has a Lestat Louis Pass on stage at big rock concert. That sounds pretty explicit. But she says I remember the year interview of the Vampire was published, a young man came to me at Berkeley and told me he thought an interview with the vampires the longest sustained gay allegory in the English language. That is something a university student would say. So it's I was kind of amazed, but it wasn't a conscious thing. Any nominees for the longest sustained gay algory from the English language so or anything in Don Juan. Yeah, it's thinking it must be done, Juan. Maybe Satan actually was in love with God. Obviously Achilles, in fact, you I don't know. Yeah, really, a Balia's longer than the interview that man. Maybe not some of the sequels, which get pretty particulars. Definitely the first book. Yeah, but it's in the same interview from two thousand and eleven. And Rice says if she had to do it over again, she would not use the word vampire in Hannimals, claiming that in one thousand nine hundred and seventy six, when interviewed the vampire was published, there was no vampire literature published in America and there was no goth culture and certainly there was no vampire lifestyle and I'm not sure there is any vampire lifestyle today. As far as I know, vampires did not exist, as far as I know. Also, I'm not sure. I think this is either right in the middle or just now. This must be just after she's coming out. She went through like a religious like ten year thing, because she's always been religious, but there was like a ten year period, I think it's from like two thousand to two thousand and ten, where she'd went like Nah, I'm going like full Catholic and like denounced all her previous work as like sinful and everything was like horrible, and then came back with a vengeance and was like no, I tried that shit for ten years and like I believe in God and stuff. That then Catholics are crazy and vampires are cool. Yeah, she said. At the end of this interview she says, Oh, by the way, I'm working on a new novel. It's about like aliens and Atlantis and Shit. That's not the direct word. And then the other last book in the Vampire Chronicle Series is the Prince Lestat and the history of Atlantis sorts something. It's okay. The first story books, the through the quaint of the Damn but there's like ten down the thing and just knowing that they end up with aliens and Atlantis is it's quite a predict the adults, sort of. But yeah, our Ross brings in the broody Byronic, you know, trouble tortured there by archetype, in saying she based on the tradition of dark stories, in the tradition of Shakespeare and Milton and Franken Science. So now, boy, she claims she didn't do much like reading about vampires. The rain one she was influenced by was the sequel to the Bell A. GO SEE DRACULA, Dracula's daughter. Have you seen that one, Nar because ys in the first time, I know you felt it's quite good. It's about because of the end of the first track of maybe director I gets killed by manhousing, right, and then the second maybe jacklist door starts with is like Hungarian Countess, as if she's dracula daughter, but she has been like freed from her vampire curse because tractle has been killed and she's like well, what do I do now, like I am free? How do I start again? And she really has this reflective thing about her so m I said she she watched this film about this beautiful daughter of Dracula who was also an hardest in London and felt...

...drinking blood was a curse, and then that film mesmerized her and established what vampires were, that they were these elegant, tragic, sensitive people and that she was really just going with that feeling when writing interview at the vampire and don't do a lot of other research. So that gives us a pretty like people are claiming barnus Collins from dark shadows is the first sympathetic vampire, but truck with his daughter is not only a precursor but also one that directly influenced interview with a vampire. There I would say what's missing from this is vanny the vampire. There's not that we bothered reading it because it was so fucking long. It's so fucking long. I do have the bridge version that I made, if you want, on the first volume, but vitic of everything that happens into the vampire happens in environing the vampire. Yes, so I'm going to read a passage from running the vampire right now because there's there's a scene where and he's kind of affairs, because finding his whole thing is he's trying to get this family, I think I explains before. He's trying to get this family to move out of a mansion so that he can buy it and then sell it and pat off his debt to a guy who draining into the room life, and he goes and visits the the girl that he's been terro righting to try and scare out. The mount goes. Well, what if I just explain myself to her? So like the creature in Frankins Day, like the creature in front Instein, like Lewis in interview, the vampire. And then after that, yeah, invited the vampire. They say, I much rejoice that you have had an interview with this mysterious being, for you have, since that time, been happy and more composed than I ever heard to see again. And then she responds. Somehow, since that interview I have not had the same sort of dread of Sir Frances Fanny which performed the very sound of his name and narrative terror to me. His words and all he said to me during that interview, which took place so strangely between us, indeed, I know not tended altogether rather to make him to a certain extent, and object of my sympathies rather than my abhorrence. HMM. So I want to go back here further and say bunny is definitively the first or, if not the first, is a precursor, sympathetic vampire like that's written in the text, the problem being that he's manipulating her situation, he's sort of making up a back story. So it's a difference, a variation on the gothic killer that eventually becomes reality, rather than making a valley and technique interesting. But yet there are the the bottoms column story of when he is introduced is directly the first act of Varney the vampire, and then where it develops, ends up being interviewed the vampire. Now I don't know if they could have read this thing because it was like out of print until, I think, the s which is around when these books were being written, but I don't think was like popularly distributed. So I don't know if they would have had access to funny the vampire. But like this, so much stuff in that that like it's very hard to think that it didn't like creep through through, just like cultural osmosis influence somehow. But yeah, there are. There are so many very specific crossovers. I mean it's just the vernacular of the time, but calling the thing the interview with the vampire is something he's yeah, quite striking. But as for developing how the one vampires actually work, when asked how she developed her set of vampire rules, and I was responded that she went along with what she had inherited from Hollywood, which perhaps gives us you know why Pratchett's vampires are so Hollywood. Last is because the the most literary vampires are also film inspired. And she says, yeah, she went along with what she inherited from Hollywood, which is that vampires burned up in the sun. And she says, I didn't know. That wasn't part of the original Dracula. So she just wrote it in and created this new vampire mythology. And she says in the rest I sort of made up. Liar. She thought, well, you know, they they don't really operate. And then the ways that the the pretty because so idens dracular tape is doing the dracular things. Same with I am Legending, though Dracula's not involved. He's going through the list of things in dracular and explaining him, whereas ours, I think, brings in a new kind of vampire and new archetype. And she says that she thought if Vampires responded hysterically to Galic or crucifixes, that wasn't as interesting as they're being nihilistic and esthetic and not having a magical response to something but having definitive limitations and rules. Again, we're getting that built off, I am legend and taking it out of the mystical realm into the secular scientific one. So the first sequel to interview the Vampire, the vampire stat which comes out in one thousand nine hundred and eighty five, is very interesting. I think at least five our purposes, because it's all about Satan. I think I said this to you before, but you should really read this book. Allus well, when I say you should read this book, that's not age, that's not the royal youth, that's not the general you. If you're interested in Vampires and Satan, you should read this book. No one else really needs to read it, but Alice needs to read this book because this is about the history of Lestat, who use the like cool qua. He's the barer vampire I also realized, like Louis and Lestad and interview, the vampire are Barron and shally. That's what's going on there. HMM, I had I had my suspicions. So lostats Barron, he's the cooler who comes in and corrupts everyone. But it's just about him going around the world to all the different vampire covers, trying to work out what being a vampires all about and arguing with them about Satan, because he's like why you're why? You're all scared of Crosses, and if...

...you believe in God, then you believe in Satan. Therefore Satan's real. So what do I mean? Broce Satan, and that's where Antonio Banderas Armand who's I'm little Cheruboy in the books, Arather than a big, barely Spanish man. He's like the leader of all a yeah, satanic cold and they worship with stat because lostatte dares to walk on consecrated ground and he isn't plagued by the superstitions of the Vampires who are afraid of God. So He is very much portrayed as acetaic figure in the Milton sataic sense that he is defining God. But then he also, yes, uses that to then some of the satanism real and is like just this nihilist. I think you'd find it very interesting that other people maybe not so much, because it is just dry dialogs about nature of Satan and I write moment the wonder I can read anything. Also, he's like a rock star. Okay, that's not really in the look, but it but it is like it's the framing tales, like we'll start work up to join the band, then told him, then brote his history of Satanism and then at the end it's like, Oh yeah, he was in a band. I mean, wasn't there that whole satanic panic about like a rock is Satan or something for a while? So, yeah, you wrote that. That would have been right in the middle of this. So yeah, that makes sense. That's where all the Hamma horror films go. They do like five films where it's just the same story over and our going. A FAMILY GOES TO THE CASTLE, Dracula Kills and they killed Dracula rookie and then like seven Urbis in. They're like all right, modern day and they bring him into the s and it's like a s cop murder mystery starring Dracula. But yes, the Satan is involved. They start investigating satanic rich ors and things, and that's right when the satanic packs go on. So yes, to panic is a big part of this vampire story as well. That, I don't think, preture. It's really engaging with it all. Oh yeah, Pratchett, that's why I we are and and just to bring back, if not to Pratchett, to found of the offer and masquerade and things. Did you know that there was a musical version of interview the hire called the stuff the musical, with music by Elton John, which opened on Broadway in two thousand and six. So maybe he wasn't gay. I think that's that. You got the Alton stamp of gay approval. My God, what more could one expect of something new? A feast of Sat Sander Sinner's, a Homespun web of bold beginnings, this new world, most the most collective stew, this New Orleans, this melting pot. It's overflowing with pastors. Been Dragon really came across. That's pretty good. I'm a good, very terrible. Well, I'm like the runaway success of family. It's not. The musical closed after on the thirty bod performances uniformly negative reviews, including one published in the New York Post declaring it bloody awful. Yeah, although, yes, this this also gives me an opportunity to mention my favorite vampire thing of all time. I think so. Doing the Carpet Dragon, I've read like, I think that's close to like fifty books at this point, a hundred movies. But my favorite vampire thing remains the two thousand and fifteen heavy metal rock opera concept Album Dracula swinger death by Norwegian singer John Land and guitarist trump alter, which fucking earns and you will be hearing a bit of it right now. I really so. I don't an early sympathetic...

...vampire. That is Josey series of novel starting Cymatic Vampire Count Saint Germain, based on the eighteen century French alchemist of the same name. I think I sent you a message about this one. This is has strong ties to the monk and as a flare and things like that, because this one the vampires, the good guy. He's a cool alchemist and he's trying to be seduced and recruited by a group of bad alchemist who keeps kidnapping virgins and sacrificing them on their all top below the church. You know that, to Ray Satan and gain eternal life. I mean we've all had that face. It's like it's a really dry, boring Victorian, like drummer manners sort of the thing. And then like sixty pages in satanic sacrifice, like Philo, graphic buked thing. Any that. So this books about? Okay, okay, yeah, so the first of these books are hotel Transylvania. was from one thousand nine hundred and seventy eight. So a few years after interview, the Vampire and the vampire take and they are almost thirty sequels to this book that are still being written. Stop Stopping. Yeah, well, I stopped after one. Apparently, though, she tried to sell the novel in One Thousand Nine hundred and seventy one. That probably shows weren't interested until interview was popular. So I don't know. Remember. There was the something definitely going on around the late s early seventies trying to sympathize these monstrous figures, but specifically vampires, and I don't really know why wait, although the line I've just seen is he could make love to women but had no seemen. All right, we'll get there. So melcol describes centermain as a romantic hero who developed ongoing relationships with women and could make love to them, but had no seamen. Rather, he took their blood and in fact lived largely upon willing female downers. But there was one important limitation on his sexual life, in the joys and benefits of the sexual share and could only occur between a vampire and a non vampire. So you don't get to come if it's also a vampire. Okay, yeah, I'm not really sure why it can't be vampires. Are Two vampires, because I didn't bother reading the sequels. The first book was bad, so it's Molan concludes. Thus, while the vampire lived for many years, he could not bring his lover all lovers with him. But this is significant because this gives us the vampire as a romantic. Lot of a case are romantic as a love interest, because a rice's vampires don't even not have seven. They cannot get directions. No further questions. I'm just going to accept and move on in life. Whereas the vampires in true blood and many modern vampire books where the vampires are the honey love interests. I think it's true blood, where they can specifically like have eternal erections because they can control the their blood. Does that makes sense, because the original explanation for like why we get directions and like how we lost control of a central nervous system was it was one of God's little jokes after we fell. Like that was one of the things we lost in the fall. So women who blush, it betrays their in a, you know whatever, horniness, but also the depravity. And then the male erection is like Hah, like God showing you that you can't control your yeah, your depravity. So I guess if Vampires are like deprove to Sin Full Satanic Beasts, they get that back. I don't know. HMM, interesting, although I think you'd like the idea. Is that being fed up by a vampire and interview the Nampires orchasmic? Okay, well, there's also that explanation. There's a lot of stuff about vampire erection. Yeah, they shouldn't be there. Don't have time to do apart. Four. Is it fellow logo centric, like I said, drink? Yeah, I just feel like you'd end up bumping into things all day long. It's generally like within four to eight inches of your body. I don't know. I've us because it's not a bit of an angle. I don't have one, so I wouldn't know. Are you a vampire? Maybe? Maybe. The other interesting thing about Queen Yago sent Germain is that is one of these are subversions of the traditional vampire troops that I want to talk more about in the next part is that he has specially constructed hollow shoes that he fills with his native soil, so you can just walk anywhere. That's cool. Yeah, I know, that's a cool one. Let's just like it. One said that she just puts it in there and that's like, is there, I can walk around our way about. But what did if you just put it in, it sucks out that Yallow claims her big contribution was that she wanted to extrapolate the vampire's long lifes man to imply a more cultivated life of scholarship and education and things, rather than just going around conquering things, which we again, we don't really get that he and interview the Vampire because they're too busy being sad. But when we do get it, joy ever, guess it's Varney, the answers, Vanny, Vanni. There's is always vanny. Okay, yeah, this is again. This is something Vanni did. So sort of the three big things that these books do, Vanni does. I don't know, we could have said a lot of time. If ever runch is read, Varney or Vanni was better. I'm good. Well, it was very popular at the time. It's just that that form of serialized storytelling like fell out of favor. So it's like pretty unwieldy...

...to a person novel audience. All right, we're coming. This is the barn redux. I excited for this one. And now I want to talk to you about the one thousand nine hundred and eighty two novel, fever dream, by a game of thrones author, George R Martin, says, I think, his second author book. So to quickly explain the plot, this is about a Mississippi, and not Mississippi New Orleans, you know. It's a mississip, one of those a riverboat captain who is employed by a vampire who is a like competing with another vampire, and there's vampire was going on and they're trying to develop a vampire serum. It's pretty good you can skip like the first ten chapters, but then I get a real interesting but there is a lot of Barron references here and that they specifically read bar and shows poetry. So I've just taken out all the the the Byron relevant sections here and I just wanted to run them by you yes early when they're there. Vampire Blood Master Joshua York is introducing himself to his steamboat captain at a marsh. He ask if he knows a barn, to which march replies, give wasn't he, but quite a one for the ladies. So hey man, but I think that was a pretty good, you know, salvation of Barron. Yeah, and the Bier Iq here or even okay, well, yeah, I also found that interesting because marsh is disfigured. He's introduced as being the ugliest man on the river. I'm massive man with a red face and a full black beard that he wore to cover up a flat pushed in the nose and a face full of warts. So again this idea of the gothic villain being disfigured in things. Barron was like, I don't want to say disfigured, because he's like a real yes, not foot. He had a club point. Yeah, GIMP, wasn't he? And quiet one for the ladies by A. See, I think Jord Armand's doing something here with the appearance and the Gothic tradition. Later, examining a picture bar in one of his collections, Marshal marks that he looked pretty enough, dark and sensual. Like a creole. It was easy to see whether women went from sir, even if he was supposed to be a GIB, supposed to be he was a give and marsh reflects the beauty was never something he had experienced from within. With his bulk, his waltz, his flat squash Nais, he had never had to worry over much about women. Neither so he was relating to Byron here. Maybe that's a lost part of the Byroni here is the GIG pitchness. York, who's here again, is a immortal vampire. Also reveals that he had the good fortune to meet Barron once, saying that their steamboat, the eponymous fever dream, reminded him of Byron's poem. She walks in beauty, and the characters and crew regularly discussed barn and shellies, poetry, reading, the destruction of channacher but darkness among other poems, and the fever dream was renamed the Yuzzy Mandius after show his poem by the Evil Vampire Blood Master Damon Julian, and Marsh attempts to track him down by reading every goddamn poem and Byron, and shall he ever vote to the point that he had the damn poems memorized and even went on to other poets. So this is sort of a artistic or poetic in version of Van helsing scientific folklore Verach to hunting vampires. This is now, rather than reading folklore to track Vampire's George Armatin is saying he had know you have to eat poetry, you have to eat barn at Shelly's poet treat to understand their hires, which I thought was pretty cool. HMM, it is cool. It's interesting also in terms of Byron Akuro stuff, right, because we're talking about how, with how vampires became the dract, the thing. They just keep reading the director things since till they start experimenting and then the creature. We know that, even if you haven't seen Frankenstein, there's this cultural understanding, and it is often wrong, of what that is and I think there's something similar going on with the baron a cure here, because although he talks about the other poems, and I'd say the most obscure one is the destruction of Senature, of all the other stuff, is like the surface what everyone knows about Byron, and all of the complex stuff of what a byronic hero is is taken away. So what I'm saying is we're back to my old like issue, the thing I will go to the grave about of like Byronic heros not being created by Byron. They've created about Byron, ideas about Barncros after the fact. I think George Martin is taking part of that and it's fun and like, but it's nothing more than I'll give, wasn't it? And it's like Byron is a complex figure, obviously, but they just like reduce him down to that the same way they have done with his heroes. Does that make sense? It does, but I think you you're under selling George Ar Martin, who is I think so too. He's not only just saying are you am Barrons again, he's specifically pointing that out, like with, you know, Vaur fire tradition that has glamorized by as this sexy ladies man and going. Well, he was, but not for the reasons we've portraying us. And Yeah, I think that's that's running along yet parallel, I guess. Like, yeah, I think the tour at work here. I think it's just interesting that what he's telling us about buyer it is like the old like the obvious stuff, and then he adds In't that he has a he had bought. Potentially he's identified with him. Wi. Yeah, yes, so, yes, this, this is another one, along with the the vampire. said that lest at that. I would recommend you alis read when you have a chance, but also this is one I would recommend other people as well. It's quite good. It does you can literally skip like the first ten out twelve chapters because the story just does not kick until then. And then, like,...

I think it's chapter thirteen before I breakdown of like okay, here's what's going on. He lays out the whole life vampire story there. But yeah, we're doing up to the S and we're not going to go much further, because I don't think pratchet goes much further than the S in there and s with the hammer horror films, another vampire Trope, though, that we do get directly engaged with. The in cover Jolan, though, is the trope of the badass priest, with Miley oats. Oh yeah, yeah, okay, that of course. Who's playing with a trope? That's what that character was bugging man like. What is this? This is something. Well's what the horrible website TV tropes calls the badass preacher. It is a horrible website. Anyone here from dark hero go elsewhere. Thank you. Please stop starting at in your eye your essays, although I have I found myself sliding at a few times in these transcripts, and so it's allowed some of the work I'm doing on vampires at the robot because it's just where people have actually cataloged things. But yes, Modley oats is described there as, yes, an example of the Badass preacher saying that early and unseen academicals, Miss and nut says, is he brought forgiveness and late in unseen academic halls. It's revealed that forgiveness, while he may have brought the concept as well, happens to be the name of his acts. And this implied to be the same acts from carpet Jack of them, which was transformed from a simple, ordinary axe into a weapon that could hurt vampires, all because of his earnest faith. That's fucking so when you're asking where this comes from, I mean they're the hammer films. They have a films, have the best fan of housing, the just Peter Cushing, who's a probably most well known today as Graham off Tarken from Star Wars, who finds the best start Bos of old one, but yes, he was more famous before that for being van helsing and just which hunters and just general badasses in in have a vampire movies, including the other preacher, and I think it's kiss of the vampire. No, it's not, it's another one. He plays like a preacher in one other ones. But I think where the concept really takes hold is through Stephen King's Salem's lot from one Thousan nine hundred and seventy five, where you have the character Father Calahan, and I read the Palms Lot. Nor I'm going to go out on them and say don't read Salem's lot, don't watch salms lot. The movie salems like is incredibly influential and incredibly well regarded and has not aged well at all. It's like a seven hundred page book where the first three hundred fifty pages nothing happens. It has some cool scenes, one of which is Father Calahan's confrontation with the vampire, but I think, I think that's where we get the the idea of the the badass priest. I do want to talk about oats a bit more when we do do small guards, and we can talk about comnism a bit more years. It's other prominent examples, as you have the the pre jus from from dust to dawn and Dan since children of the night, with a character and that is also has his leg amputated. So he was a given one for the ladies, because he goes parents seducing people. The the book vampires by John Stakeley, good name for a vampire author. We made that. And then the dressman files, which are horrible. They are horrible. Thank you good God. They're horrible. I do I told you. I bring in though. They're opening part of the this the chapter that introduces the female lead as an example of found that male gays to our students. But of course this tart in the modern form evolves into the form of the vampire slayer right. So obviously dates back to van Helsing, who becomes this preacher in the hammer films and so on, but then you get things like vampire hunt to be blade, and need of like alley card from helsing in Castlevania, but also, and rest influentially, buffy. Right, you know more about but buffy the meat. You want to say anything about buffer? Not Really. Alice is tired. I mean, there's really not a lot to say about buffy. It's a you know, teen dramas, Sitcom with vampires, that it's Gothic and fun, like it's fun, but it's funny. Well, it's. You still have my book, my Andrew Melibook where he talks about Buffy's connection to paradise, lost through friendstil black. I forgot. That's why you gave it to me and while I was that is why I gave it to damn it. I'll get to that. Okay, there's a lot to say about buffy in terms of vampire scholarship, but I will say that I figure everyone talks about it because it's the easy one that everyone goes to write. What's very popular and it's very influential, and when it is influential is one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight when coverage comes out, that's when buffis hitting it. So I did want to point out that there there's something going on in the n S. again, like we're saying, there's something going on in the s where vampire something gets sympathized. There is something going on the s where vampire fiction explodes to do with the AIDS crisis. Then that is reference in some of them. They're not as prevalent onely as you would think. Okay, I think I might have more to do with the BI centennial or note the Centennial Off Dracula in one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. There's something in the nineties where not not only do you get an explosion of vampire fiction, we get this wild experimentation that sort of starts in the mid s with films like fright night and the lost boys. Have we seen the lost boys? I'm going to watch it. I will. Lost Boys is a movie that I can't say is a good movie, but it is a very important movie.

I can say it's a good movie. It's a fine movie. There's a sexy sets man. It's great. Do you want to Google the the the poster of the lost boys for me correctly. Oh yes, so if we got this first one with the red background, to do with the sunglasses. Okay, so, and that is the spire and shelley and marriage ellie right here. You're on to this. It's not Myra and Shelly, Mary Shelley, because I think the guy you're picking out a shelley in the middle there. That's keep usum, and a young Ki that's like a Jack bewer is more of a Barron figure. He's the bad guy and the cool bar and guy on the left is the good guy. But yes, this movie is most famous, apart from the sexy Saxman, which she'll know what when you see it is. Yeah, for Starr, we young kid the sun and the two quarries, courty hang and Corey Feldman. This is their first collaboration that became a thing. But whatever I'm forgets is the actual main character in the hero of the movie is that Barron Looking Guy on the left with the suddy's and the dark hair, who is an actor named Jason Patrick. Do you want to know his other film credits? Go on. He Played Lord Barn in the One thousand nine hundred and ninety film adaptation of Brian Now this is notine hundred seventy three novel Frankenstein. I'm bad terab and the all thing. Insert protagonist ruggles back in time to burn Mary Shelley, and he's one of the absolute worst books I have ever read. Also, I feel like he got the Byron Roll just because of his cheek bones, like he's clearly a descendant of one of Byron's terrible family members. Good Lord, de Barron, have the cheek burns. Yeah, Byron had the cheek brinds. Just look at a painting of him. He's got the cheek birds. Okay, yeah, yes, there was also a sequel to frank stint bound release that say are called draculine bound, what I have not read because it's hard to access. That's all happening at the start of the nineties. Yeah, there's the centenary one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven, which is marked by an officially authorized seek called Dracula the UNDEAD which, as we mentioned before, was the working title for Dracoa. This is written, as authorized by the BRAM staker estate, by an author named free to Warrington, who I don't know if they've written anything else. This book is it's pretty good again. It's about going to a secret the the scholar Mancy, which is mentioned in Dracca. That's like the The a evil satatic wizard school. They go and find that and they release Satan and then Dracula has to fight saying now maybe Jacqulo is Satan and Satan has a big fire dragon, lots of Satan. So recommend that one to you maybe, and of course, copied JOG al. I'm coming in at the end. There there's friends Ford Capella's Horrible Film Grand Stokes Dracula, which has the audacity to call itself Brand Service Dracula and then have a SYMPATHIZATION OF DRACULA WHO's pining for his lost life and and he's just a vironic dude. So Not Brown stoke is dracular at all and also has the audacity to Caskeanu Reeves as Jonathan Harkup. The audacity it's you hear he's accent. I love him. There's only one accent worse than that in all of vampire film and that is keep back and sale and Van Housing. But yes, quite. I don't know if there's ever been a more miscast role than that one. But somehow people like that maybe interviewed. The Vampire of course, gets filmed and yes, lots of stuff going on that I will talk more about in the bonus episodes I'm going to do about films in the books. Yes, also in two thousand and twelve and two thousand and eleven. So a little bit after the fact, there was a an award, a Bram Stoker Award by the Horror Writers Association for the Vampire and novel of this century. Okay, the nominees were the soft whisper of the dead from one thousand nine hundred and eighty three, written by Charles l Graham, one of the worst books I've ever read. No idea how that made the list. So we can ignore that one. But the other nominees were Salem's lot by Stephen King, which we mentioned, I am legend, and our Dracula from one thousand nine hundred and ninety two, which is another one that comes through, which that's about a alternate history where Dracula succeeded in conquering London and then the aristocracy's populated by all the vampires from the literary history. To me I thought it sounds like it's true. They also they mainly just hang out and play cricket. Yeah, that sounds like Morris Johnson. Good Point, Rost Johnson, vampire can fig. So there's that one interview with a vampire and then Hotel Trans Vadia, the one with the spermless very pie, which is cutting arbor. Well, that's what I was going to ask you. Do you want to take a stay? I'm going to say interview with the Vampire. I would have said that's the one. I think that's fine. Legends, actually it was, I am legend Charles, quite surprised to see when. I would have thought they'd go with your interview or Salem's lot, but they want with ourn legend, which might be my favorite book of those, I'm not sure. So that's what's going on in the naughties and project comes along right at the tail end of that, which I bring up to say that it's interesting that he's like the postpondenous satirist guy and he's playing with this vampire tradition, but all this other stuff is going on around him with Vampires and he's really sticking to the traditional idea in of Yah, the sixty south. I mean kind of gestures towards the seductive aspect of the the black guys trying to seduce adnes. But like none of the vampires are like tortured or ironic or piring. They're all this old gothic villain. HMM, Dracula...

...assistant say, I guess he's focusing more on the dracular tradition than the vamp hire tradition and therefore is focusing on the bionic tradition rather than the vampire dreary. Yeah, interesting. Well, I would say the other way. He's focusing on the gothic tradition rather than the bioactrup. Okay, all right, you lost me, but yeah, yes, and just just to wrap up quickly, the other thing that happens in the nineties is the beginning of the next phase of the Vampire Archetta, which is the beloved vampire. Should so you have the monstrous vampire, the sympathetic vampire. There's now what what we're calling the beloved vampire, which is, you, twilight's right. Twilight's the big one that really comes out in two thousand and five and I think, yeah, after into the Vampire and Dracula is like the Big One. That's the paradigm shifting book for incomprehensible reasons, that's the one that stuck. But this tradition actually starts in, or is commonly attributed to, J Smith's first vampire diaries novel, the awakening from one thousand nine hundred and ninety one. So protests coming along and doing this right as we're getting the shift in the tradition. And if he's not engaging with the sympathetic bionic vampire trope, well it's already that's troops almost already over and we're shifting into this new thing which everything's been dominated by now by it's more about that in the next episode, maybe because something that comes along with that is what in twilight is called Vegetarian Vampires, who are definitively not vegetarian because they whole thing is they drink animal blood rather than human blood. But that is a one of the tropes that separates, or some people would argue separates a beloved vampire from a sympathetic vampire. Right, Louis in interview, the vampire tries to not drink human blood until the status goes D give it up. Your men to drink blood. You're a vampire. Stop being such a pussy, essentially. But then you get to the columns. Who are they're all about nature and it's like a sustainability near a Carsychum at the dig a lot of problems with and maybe invite Sophie on and to talk about that because she wrote a thesis about it. But this is part of the modern vampire tradition that Pratchett's engaging with, because we get the slight reference to Camilla, who are the drunk animals blood, right at the end of COPPA Juggulart. But then project goes on to develop this in especially at the truth, and I think it's the fifth Elph and Thud where we get the introduction of the Vampire temperates league and the Black Riveters, who vampires are able to integrate into modern have more box society by I'm taking avow of a non human blood drinking. So this is an aspect that Pratchett engages with rather in depth that I'm very interested in and I'm writing about Alice. That was very good. I'm excited. I was excited to hear the culmination of like five or six months worth of work from Josh. So I think it's not in August. I have, while I have promised that we were going to do a third little go through. Do It, do we want to do we have that in us, even in me. All right, and then we'll do more. We'll do that, then we'll do then we'll do the richest series wrap up, which I did put out a little thing on the feed saying hey, if you got any questions about the witch's books, which is series, send I mean, I'm sad this is the last one, but also I'm excited from Mord which is the one I think I remember the most about from being a teenagers. Yeah, well, when we get some more, which will probably be in a month or two, by the time we record and die it because I've started a new job, on moving house. House has covided. Our life's a disaster. I have to write an article in this month. I've got to read on my year twelve text what they've changed. That trains the old. I am more, which is why I'm looking to you to have a lot to say that, because this is going to be about the the buildings remember, but also the heroes journey. Yeah, baby, that's what our farther mindless thesis on. I legend you write yours on the heroes journey, so should be well equick to tackle that. Yeah, well, yeah, no, I didn't it. You're right. I was going to say I did what I did. I wrote I was like the Anti Heroes Journey. I'm like, what's the bad guys doing? But, yeah, you're right, I don't me. He's death's apprentice. That's pretty anti hero right not? You know my thesis better than me. Well, foks. All right, we'll see you for that when we got around to it. Goodbye. Why? And we're clear? That's all for this episode of unseen academicals. There'll be another one along in the month, but if you can't wait until then, you can sign up to our patreon page and get all the episodes of full month in advance, along with any burnus episodes or specials that we end up doing. If you're after more of us. Alice hosts her own podcast of the Devil's Party, which traces the development of the satanic hero throughout Romantic and Gothic literature. Thanks to a bibliography for today's show, along with a fully referenced and footnote, a transcript should be available in the episode description. Thanks for listening and stay tuned for some amusing out takes. King Nigrom, Divon Park USL...

...nor good as bright, the destroyer fellow buckle ridges, Christen Bell Board far and the Gela Gustustavo, Paula Dory. It was RHYMA wasn't pressed. Bonnie the vampire straight, the mysterious Pumilla and Clara Bond Abrahama, strukiller and married bride's blood, Shambalaw and love Croft, Dexter warning cur when Dusser rudge was up. What Fella doesn't drink wine? We didn't stop them highs. They were always heard and people into bad prayers between. Stop them highs. There we could, and far the boy tried to write them as Parral Park Fellas back as arm on Dragon, telb Wanaquy House and frank in Stein, black Sunday, blood and versus trilogy, Constant Horror Comics. Marbels turned blood spotted Friday. That, for all is hot. But steader, what's up of your book talk in the Semmerment, I am wing Mathis and Peter, but Stephen King failing. For the next big thing comes. PIP think got the paper pillers mykill. We didn't stop them fires. They were always turning people into them fires. We didn't start them fires. There we could and fight the boat and try to write them. Them Adams and we will evil days and scary pading non ser good for color until until God he's a safe interview with the Parson. Waste up worst space beans when your bird, Susie markey's tapestry strive as they luck is hungry Cam and Siss Thedam Queen Armand's fever drink gandred Holton family keep at the colory. We didn't stop them Pires. They were always hurting people into them, and we didn't stop them Pires, though we couldn't park the bobby try to write the style. You men covered my grip and for and housing. Now just infer wakening Jim and studren of the night offs in butting with her brother and talk Yanni's up in is over water and muscrew race from the Angel Conte Lake. But to take wait, who after we have? We didn't start are them Pires. They will always turning people into vampires. We didn't stop them highest. Now we could have pipe the bry to write the erry's rhythms which Ling Linklas with the right one in the sunshine during. Shame on the well S. turn a you the this time tar on the air like it w call and he's a man. Jacob doesn't stand as Eric Feeling Sam all dry, taking some before right. This is spirit versus chest. Jordan, Drum Spring and get sum until there's what's up on? This one's a fund. I won't not unless there, when they don't hurt to go. We didn't stop them, highs. They were always turning people leave to their fires. We didn't stop them, highs. But when we're gone now we've on it on and dad and and and dawn and dawn and dawn and on and dawn and and all and gone and dawn and on and on and on and on and on and up and dawn and and dawn and on and and and all and on and going down and done and and and and about. Okay, and then one, okay, three, four, five, six, six countings are he sent me up. I was like six, wait, what do we do at six numbers? Yeah, you good, you feeling all right? Yeah, I left to poop before seventies lesbians. Yeah, sorry, I had I'll have to hurt s lesbians. That's that's what I said. Well, I guess we are going to talk about seven these lesbians. Okay, where are the lesbians? They're on the next page. Okay, where are they? I don't know. Josh, to be your Rice or, of course, died pretty recently.

I just want to acknowledge that. Nothing really to say about it, but she died in the middle of what I was putting all this together and reading these books. It is five books are pretty good, then let me try. I'm trying to telephone now. Eternal erections, Yo, I mean in Sunday, right now, not giving.

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